your progress with these methods

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#1 1 December, 2017 - 08:22
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your progress with these methods


i was recently browsing the web looking for studying strategies and the topic of mnemonics was frequently mentioned

since this forum seems to be all of that, before i go search deeper, a question comes to my mind "how effective is this?"

I've seen some articles talking about this helping students with learning disabilities, but i didn't find much about the effectiveness of this on your average/normal student

so, what are your personal achievements?

has anyone tracked their progress?

how fast are you learning now V.S. how fast were you learning before?

5 December, 2017 - 01:59
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Either there's a lack of interest to answer these questions or no one is making progress.

5 December, 2017 - 04:02
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Or people are busy with their jobs and families and prefer to not give a rushed answer. :D

I have used mnemonics to study, and it does depend on what you have to learn. If you have to learn things you have to know, like countries of the world, it is useful. But if you have to understand, like designing electrical grids, you will need different techniques.

Focussing on the things you have to know, I can say that it doesnt go faster. I noticed memory palaces to be more useful than stories or pegs, but especially virtual palaces take time to make. Depending on what you have to learn, you could have a need for 100 loci or 1.000 loci, which you have to build before learning. Especially on the subjects requiring a lot of loci, you will face the building of the memory palaces.

Once you have them and maintain them, the information does sit around in your mind longer. With "drilling" the knowledge into your mind, it quickly disappears again, usually right after the test. Mnemonics allow you to save this knowledge for longer.

5 December, 2017 - 06:57
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Some progress is quantifiable, some not. I suppose the most quantifiable progress you can find is the records of the mental athletes. If you search around this forum, you'll find people who first memorized a deck of cards in 10 minutes, then got that down to 5 minutes, then 3 minutes, etc. Same thing with the other disciplines. When I first started the Images discipline on Memory League, I could not memorize the order of the 30 images in the 60 seconds allotted. Now, I can routinely do it in under 25 seconds, with my best being around 18 seconds. There are some people who can memorize a list of 50 random words in less than 60 seconds, or memorize 30 Names & Faces in the same time.

There are numerous people who have used mnemonic techniques to more effectively memorize vocabulary, or facts used in studies. There are others who have used the techniques to wow and amaze on TV shows (like FOX's Superhuman). Many others have used these techniques to increase their networking skills (Names and Faces is especially important in the business world) or memorize speeches they give. Some use these techniques for everyday practical use, such as memorizing credit card numbers, passwords, birthdays, social security numbers, etc.

I suppose the usefulness of these techniques for helping students with learning disabilities depends on the disability. I don't know how much research has been done on this. Maybe some of the forum members with educational backgrounds can answer this. I do know that my daughter, who has dyslexia, has an easier time memorizing things since I taught her how to use memory palaces, but that doesn't really help with dyslexia, which requires an intense focus on phonemic awareness using methods based on Orton-Gillingham.

5 December, 2017 - 14:22
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Joined: 4 weeks 18 hours ago

@mayarra well in my defense, i did post this 5 days ago

@tracym

that's quite some progress, but i'm still a bit skeptic.

I'll put a counter argument that they could've just gotten better at doing a specific task, rather than in general improving memorization. But this will also naturally happen without any memory tricks, just due to repetition. Like riding a bike, at first you fall off but 1 month down the line you're riding without hands.

6 December, 2017 - 01:02
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And in the forum's defence, people have lives outside of the forum. Sometimes it takes a while to get a reply.

Also if you are skeptic and say that what we do is just as easily achieved by learning through mere repetition, I'm not sure what it is you are looking for here. Instead, test it yourself.

Back in school, I learned the countries of the world (or at least one version of that list). Took me about two weeks of repetition, and I forgot it all after the test. When I just started working with mnemonics, I memorized that list in a day. Including capitals of those countries that is still in my head today. Of course, you could then go and say that it was easier now because I had to learn the list all those years back.

If you are truely a skeptic, I wont pass statements as they will never confince you. Instead I'd just tell you to try it for yourself, like a true skeptic would.

6 December, 2017 - 23:43
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Indeed. Being skeptical is not the same as just doubting everything. I think the general evidence from people all over the world and through time is that mnemonics works and it has been demonstrated countless times, so it's a conclusion that is beyond any reasonable doubt.

9 December, 2017 - 07:00
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Celtic wrote:

...the general evidence from people all over the world and through time is that mnemonics works and it has been demonstrated countless times...


.

I would be most grateful if you could post a few links of that evidence please :-)

Thanks.
.

9 December, 2017 - 13:16
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Joined: 3 months 1 week ago

Harry Lorayne in public performances.
Any memory class that students can memorize a list hearing it once and then repeat it forward and backwards.
Any of the (well documented) memory championship performances occurring in countries throughout the world. Etc., etc., etc.
The earth really isn't flat.

9 December, 2017 - 18:13
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All you have to do is look at the many memory contests that have been held that show people memorizing thousands of digits in an hour, or dozens of decks of cards in an hour, or 200 Names in fifteen minutes, or a 300+ word poem in fifteen minutes, or the sequence of a deck of cards in less than 14 seconds. To those unfamiliar with mnemonic techniques, all these accomplishments seem superhuman. But they are all real results, and all these were accomplished with some form of mnemonics. These contests have been held for decades now, in many different countries on several different continents.

9 December, 2017 - 19:16
10 December, 2017 - 05:30
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I have 2000+ memory palaces (~100000+ loci) for learning and yes it works :)

13 December, 2017 - 17:47
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I should clarify my "The earth really isn't flat" comment in case it was taken as negative.
It was rather intended to be illustrative.
Science, nor I think anyone else, defends that the earth is actually round rather than flat because the evidence is overwhelming that it is round, and was known to be mathematically way back in time (BC) by the Greek guy Eratosthenes who measured the earth's circumference. And, interestingly, mnemonics has been around for as long and was developed by another Greek guy Simonides.

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