Memorizing different subjects at once - College

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#1 26 February, 2018 - 16:42
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Memorizing different subjects at once - College


Hello.

I’m new to the forum but quite experienced with memory techniques.

I am about to enter med school and I thought about using memory techniques to retain the information I learn for a long time. I wonder: which is the best way to memorize all the different information I am going to learn?

Should I use one memory palace for each subject? One memory palace for each textbook? A journey for each topic within a subject? (by the way, why people use journey as opposed to memory palace)? Flashcards with questions and spaced repetition?

My goal, of course, is for long term memory (not just memorizing for the test and then "deleting" it).

The most logical to me seems to use the memory palace, but I wonder how practical is it to have 30 palaces (or G-d knows how many), one for each subject, and then go through each one of them every time I need an info. Besides that, medical information doesn’t need a "sequence" to be learned, as opposed to lists of any type, and I think sequence is essential to palace memories, right?

I would love to have more ideas about it.

BEST

27 February, 2018 - 14:49
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Joined: 6 years 3 months ago

Hi,

It is hard to say what the best way is and it doesn't always come down using a memory palace. For example: If you had to memorize 200 new vocab words every new book for each subject, you would need 1000's of locations. Memory palaces take time to build and to keep up with studying, you would have to be doing it constantly.

Memory palaces naturally have a sequence built into them, but that doesn't mean you need to only place information that has sequence in a palace I would use a memory palace to memorize all the countries and capitals in a memory palaces even though there isn't a sequence.

It is hard to say how to go about memorizing medical information because of how much info you have to memorize! I would say take the key concepts out of the sections and place them into a palace. So if the section gives you the body systems and what they do, I would put that stuff in a palace. I suggest also using other techniques as well because so many people make the mistake thinking memory palaces have to be used for everything!

Hope this helps!

Johnny

27 February, 2018 - 16:16
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Joined: 4 months 3 weeks ago

Hello, Johnny!

Thanks for your feedback. I liked it very much because I really was with general impression that maybe Memory Palaces are "overrated" (for lack of another word, maybe "overused") when other more simple techniques would be enough.

The thing you mention about palaces having a sequence was one of my concerns. From what I see, I don’t need to memorize things from college in a sequence, and in that case using a Memory Palace would be a "waste" - such a magnific structure for facts that are more or less random.

What do you think about using pure linking systems for difficult concepts? Let’s say I have a lesson on the kidney. Maybe I can imagine a bean (similar shape to a kidney) and link the informations to that bean. So everytime I need to remember something about the kidney, I remember the bean and retrieve all the info linked to it.

I think this could be done to pretty much what I want. To a disease, to the name of a drug, to a body part, to a symptom...

The only thing is that the linking stories I would create would be in the "limbo" of my mind, not attached to any locus. But I don’t know if this is a real problem.

Suggestions on these are appreciated.

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28 February, 2018 - 20:42
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Joined: 6 years 3 months ago

Hey!

I would agree with you about it being overrated haha

A memory palace wouldn't be a waste for non sequence stuff like the Kidney because the whole palace would represent info about the kidney like in location 1 - the function, location 2 - facts, and so on. Or you can have a palace and combine the story method (link method you mentioned). One palace can be for all the organs in the body. This would help fix the limbo you are talking about. Even though you may not have a location set, there is some sort of location that pops up naturally when creating a story unless you actually picture a white room or something.

Best,
Johnny

1 March, 2018 - 04:40
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Joined: 4 months 3 weeks ago

very good points. Thank you very much, Parkouristx.

1 March, 2018 - 19:33
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Joined: 6 years 3 months ago

Glad I could help! If you have other questions, feel free to message me!

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