Help with WMC spelling rules (random words)

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#1 31 May, 2017 - 07:39
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Joined: 5 months 2 weeks ago

Help with WMC spelling rules (random words)


I would like help with the WMC rules for memorizing random words. I like memorizing random words and I do this once or twice per day (60-70 words per session). I was progressing nicely, but I was looking for a change. I had my own scoring system based on memory league where I would be satisfied with a certain percentage memorized (memory league is 2/3 correct).

But I was reading up on WMC rules and I noticed that their scoring is much stricter (and I mean much). And I wanted to incorporate this in my training. And this made practice much harder (which is not a bad thing). But I wanted some clarification on the spelling rules.

First a little introduction into these rules. Scores are doled out per 20 words. You get one point for each correctly memorized word (spelled perfectly). But for each memory mistake you get a penalty of ten points. This includes synonyms and gaps. It states specifically that the order must be correct. Each word must be numbered.

But there is an exception for spelling mistakes. If a word has been clearly memorised, but has been spelt incorrectly, no points are given for this word. But you will not get a ten point penalty. So the difference between a spelling mistake and a memory mistake is pretty big.

So I was wondering what is a spelling mistake? It is stated in the rules that plurals and singular count as a spelling mistake. Below I give some examples. And I wonder if these are spelling (-1) or memory mistakes(-10).

For example
- Lead => leader
- Choice => choose
- Propose => proposition
- Seriously => serious

My guess would be that the above are memory mistakes (so 10 point penalty). Are there any members who know how to interpret these rules?

Link to the full rules:
http://www.worldmemorychampionships.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/10-Me...

31 May, 2017 - 20:04
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Joined: 5 years 4 months ago

When I competed in the world memory championship, I was wondering the same thing! So if it is a spelling mistake as in you were really close to the spelling and they can tell you know you knew the word, you only get a -1. You have to make sure you get the tense right. An example of a spelling mistake would be weird but you wrote wierd. If you make a memory mistake as in blanking or writing the wrong word, you lose -10.

All is not really important because you should be training for perfection. If you do that, everything else will fall into place!

1 June, 2017 - 01:27
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Joined: 5 months 2 weeks ago

Quote:

All is not really important because you should be training for perfection. If you do that, everything else will fall into place!

Thanks for your reply. I agree this is the most important. This is what surprised me about the WMC rules compared to memory league. There is very little room for error with the WMC rules. I now realize I should be focussing more on accuracy than on time. Similar to practice in other sports. First focus on proper technique and speed comes after that.

1 June, 2017 - 07:26
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Joined: 2 years 2 weeks ago

That's why Memory League is better. :-)

5 June, 2017 - 11:26
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Joined: 5 years 7 months ago

I agree with Tracym. IMO, the technique is good if it makes you go faster: you learn by analyzing your mistakes and if you don't make any, you have no chance to learn and progress.

6 June, 2017 - 01:38
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Joined: 5 months 2 weeks ago

Thanks for the comments. I am changing up my practice now. I am trying to find a balance between speed and perfection. I slowed down and changed my technique a bit. I manage to recall all images now without blanks. Some mistakes slip in because of interpretation of the images (eg this moring I mixed up analysis and analyst). I could go even slower, but I also want to push myself to be faster.

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