Can you decipher this?

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#1 16 January, 2014 - 11:30
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Can you decipher this?


Decipher the following message:

BB-AA/A-H/S-G-E-AA-H-BA-C-BB/G-BA-G-BB/BD-AS/N-G-AS-AA-AH//AH/AN-AH-BA/AD-AH/AE-G-AS-AH-BB/BB-C-D-G-BB/AH-D-BB-G-BA-BD-C-BA

13 February, 2014 - 23:03
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Joined: 2 years 8 months ago

Nice puzzle. :)

Maybe they are numbers that represent letter positions that are encoded with the Dominic System? If so, there must be at least another layer on top of that.

That's as far as I got. I'd check letter frequencies next, but I have to get back to work. Maybe someone else could give it a try and see if that is the correct direction. Otherwise I'll take another look when I have some free moments. :)

14 February, 2014 - 16:33
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I don't think that's it, if it's dominic, the first couple would look like this :
22-11/1-8/0-7-5-11-8-21-3-22/
V-K/A-H/?-G-E-K- H- U- C- V/

Unless 0 is intended as A;
W-L/B-I/A-H-F-L-I-V-D-W/

Letter frequencies? For this short a sample?

I've never really attempted puzzles like this. Who else has some thoughts?

14 February, 2014 - 18:10
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In the Dominic System, S would be 6. Zero is the letter o, and doesn't appear, since if they are English letters they have to be between 1 and 26. (It might not be English.)

From this:
BB-AA/A-H/S-G-E-AA-H-BA-C-BB/G-BA-G-BB/BD-AS/N-G-AS-AA-AH//AH/AN-AH-BA/AD-AH/AE-G-AS-AH-BB/BB-C-D-G-BB/AH-D-BB-G-BA-BD-C-BA

To this:
22-11/1-8/6-7-5-11-8-21-3-22/7-21-7-22/24-16/9-7-16-11-18//18/19-18-21/14-18/15-7-16-18-22/22-3-4-7-22/18-4-22-7-21-24-3-21

If this is the right track, the final version might look something like this:
vk ah fgekucv gugv xp igpkr.
r sru nr ogptv vcdgv rdvguxcu.

(Typed quickly... might be mistakes...)

I don't know if the sample is large enough, but each two-letter word will have at least one vowel, so that might be a place to start...

R is probably a vowel. If English, it's an "a" or "i".
V is common and probably a vowel -- maybe "a" or "i", but I'd guess "a" first because letter frequency in English is "etao..." and I can't think of any common two letter words that start with "e" -- unless it isn't English.

If it's a Caesar cipher, where each letter is just shifted the same amount, then we'd only have to find one correct letter
to solve it.

14 February, 2014 - 18:30
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Joined: 2 years 8 months ago

I ran it through a Caesar cipher checker and it didn't turn up an answer.

Here's a frequency checker:
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/quenell/s2003/ma139/js/count.html

Here's the letter frequency, which might give clues to the vowels:
A 1
B 0
C 3
D 2
E 1
F 1
G 7
H 1
I 1
J 0
K 3
L 0
M 0
N 1
O 1
P 3
Q 0
R 5
S 1
T 1
U 5
V 7
W 0
X 2
Y 0
Z 0

Some of the most common letters in English are ETAOINSRH...

29 May, 2014 - 23:00
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It isn't English, is it?

30 May, 2014 - 02:35
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One thing that's notable is that the double letters all start with A or B. That's awfully suspicious. This is what one would expect if, e.g. AA was used to represent, say 27 because you have to have same way to go past Z = 26. (Think of how Excel names columns past Z. In fact, the whole string is a valid Excel formula if you see minus and divide signs. :) ) AA-AZ = 27-52, then start with BA = 53. The highest number shown would then be BD = 56. The lowest is A = 1. So if this represents such a range, then at least 56 mappings are expected, but there could be more that aren't used in what is encoded.

I am not disturbed that you go beyond 2x26. Since you speak Spanish, it is possible this is related to an old Spanish alphabet with 30 characters, but that is speculation. However, I'd guess that 56 being the shown range, I doubt that the real range of encoding is much higher than 60.

1 June, 2014 - 12:56
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So far I have seen that the majority has almost nailed it. Therefore, I have to confirm the suspicions of the majority: it's in spanish. Maybe this is an incentive to finish deciphering.

25 December, 2014 - 11:14
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Joined: 3 years 5 months ago

This is interesting:

ti yf decifsat eset vn genip.
p qps lp menpt tabet pbtesvas

23 January, 2015 - 22:04
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Joined: 3 years 5 months ago

Thanks Octaveslur, how did you realize that this has more than 26 characters?

ca. 200 years ago, spanish had 30 characters ( the 26 from english plus ñ,ch,ll,rr ) I´m not sure if it had more.

23 January, 2015 - 22:54
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Hey Olegario, and members, this is my final result:

Si yf decifras eres un genio.
O por lo menos sabes obseruar.

This is wrong, because “yf” “decifras” and “obseruar” are not correct, here is the correct one:

Si ya descifras eres un genio.
O por lo menos sabes observar.

In english it means:

If you know how to descipher you are a genius.
Or at least you can observe.

It was a bit hard. I´ll explain how I did it.;)

23 January, 2015 - 23:40
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First, Josh wrote this:

Josh Cohen wrote:
From this:
BB-AA/A-H/S-G-E-AA-H-BA-C-BB/G-BA-G-BB/BD-AS/N-G-AS-AA-AH//AH/AN-AH-BA/AD-AH/AE-G-AS-AH-BB/BB-C-D-G-BB/AH-D-BB-G-BA-BD-C-BA

To this:
22-11/1-8/6-7-5-11-8-21-3-22/7-21-7-22/24-16/9-7-16-11-18//18/19-18-21/14-18/15-7-16-18-22/22-3-4-7-22/18-4-22-7-21-24-3-21

If this is the right track, the final version might look something like this:
vk ah fgekucv gugv xp igpkr.
r sru nr ogptv vcdgv rdvguxcu.

(Typed quickly... might be mistakes...)
.

Then Octaveslur said this:

Octaveslur wrote:
It is possible this is related to an old Spanish alphabet with 30 characters.

He was right, I added "ñ" to the english alphabet (...jklmnño...) P.D: I tested with other letters such as "ch" and "ll" but I never saw something useful.

And then Olegario said this:

Olegario Nicasio wrote:
it's in spanish.

Josh was right with his "letter-number-letter in alphabetical order" conversion ( just some mistakes. ;) )

I took that and I subtracted one place to those letters beyond ñ, so it is:

uk ah fgekhtcu gtgu wo igokq.
q rqt nq ñgopu ucdgu qdugtwct.

Then using a caesar cipher ( n:-2 ) we get:

Si yf decifras eres un genio.
O por lo menos sabes obseruar.

I didn´t use a caesar cipher, I wrote the alphabet in Office Word, and I counted each letter so they could make a spanish Word.

I did it that way because I never found a caesar cipher with the ñ included :( .

5 June, 2015 - 11:47
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Joined: 4 years 3 months ago

Amazing! Somebody cracked it! I'll explain how I did it.

5 June, 2015 - 12:52
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I'm trying to comment back, but the site doesn't let me comment my answer, it's some kind of firewall thing. Maybe it's because it reads my comment as a threat, because it explains my way of cyphering my message.

I'll try commenting by parts.

5 June, 2015 - 12:53
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What I did was use the Dominic System for encoding the words. So "BB-AA" For me means "22-11". A person would think "oh, so this must mean the number of the order of the letters of the alphabet". Nevertheless, it's not so easy. Would it be "ku"? No, it isn't even a word in english or spanish. So, what does it mean? Maybe the order is wrong. Maybe the alphabet starts in 2 (a=2. b=3, c=4) or 3 (a=3. b=4. c=5).

5 June, 2015 - 12:54
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If the alphabet starts in 2, then it would say "jt". Not a known word. If the alphabet starts in 3, then it is "si", and it is a word in spanish.

For example, "S-G-E-AA-H-BA-C-BB" can be deciphered with the Dominic System and get "6-7-5-11-8-21-3-22" and try to deconvert it using some alphabetical order. In this case, 6=d, 7=e, 5=c, 11=i, 8=f, 21=r, 3=a and 22=s and get "decifras'.

5 June, 2015 - 12:57
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I made some mistakes. For example, the second word decoded is not a word. I don't remember if I did it consciously just to mess with you guys or because it was unintended. Nevertheless, it's not a real word. This also goes for the last word, "obseruar", but a spanish speaker would understand it is a mistake, that it should be read as "observar".

I hope this helps understand my thought process while writing the code.

I'm sorry for not responding sooner, I've been caught up in a lot of stuff this past few months.

10 November, 2015 - 12:06
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Joined: 3 years 5 months ago

Thanks, I've been busy too.
I'm back haha :)

And remember:

If you know how to descipher you are a genius.
Or at least you can observe. ;)

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