2 languages in the same time

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#1 7 April, 2018 - 14:52
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Joined: 10 months 4 days ago

2 languages in the same time


Hey! I want to study Hungarian at university. My native language is Polish, I know English at B2 level. Here's my question:
I know that learning Hungarian will take a plenty of time, but I would like to learn Spanish in the same time - I don't know anything in Spanish nor Hungarian yet, so I will start from basics. My main aim is to: improve my English to C1 level, learn Spanish to B1/2 level (in 3 years), learn Hungarian C1 (3+2 years at university).
Am I able to spend my almost all time Hungarian and additionaly Spanish in the meantime? Or maybe it'd be better to focus only on Hungarian and after one year take up Spanish? I have few months until I begin my studies so I want to start now with learning some language - I've already started with Spanish for only myself - it could help me to continue learning it freely while I would begin studying Hungarian from basics, right?
Please tell me what you think about it and give some advice, greetings.

14 September, 2018 - 11:43
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Joined: 3 years 2 months ago

I tried to it and found it so difficult I just had to drop one. When learning a language, you take time learning words, constructing them, listening to others speak them and trying to translate. That's a lot of work for one language, so when doing it for two, especially with no experience learning languages, that's tooooo much for one brain. It needs too to familiarize with a language, speak and understand, the grammar, construction, usage,etc. I highly recommend to just learn one, after that go for the other.

6 October, 2018 - 11:39
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Joined: 5 years 4 months ago

Mindory has a point, however we are all different. In high school I and many other studied 3 languages at same time (Swedish is my native language, Finnish and English were mandatory + 1 or 2 additional languages, in my case German). Generally it is typically easier the younger you are, but a lot has to do with other factors as well. If you are motivated enough, you might be able to do it.
As a few personal examples: my wife pursued her PhD (she's 50+ years) in less than 3 years, with 2 teenagers (3 counting me...) AND a full-time job AND household to take care of. She was motivated, that's the simple explanation in her case. Similarly I've during the years (not in parallel though) learned myself to draw portraits, run marathons, fly with airplanes, programming, financing etc, because I was motivated, not because I had any specific talent for any of them. I actually had quite poor sports grades, art skills, math skills etc. in school, was not that motivated for them, language grades were a bit better though.

So my recommendation? Personally (even if being 50+ years old), I'm pretty sure I could study 2 new languages in parallel if I'd like to = was motivated (which I'm not as of now). But this is just me, so no further conclusions can be drawn.
Sorry, you need to decide it yourself based on your 'self-knowledge'. Can you start with one of the languages, and a bit later take on the other one? It's not crystal clear to me if you are 'just' studying languages, or if you have other subjects to study as well which would steal your time.
Best recommendation: Ask counselling from the university, they should be able to guide you!

16 October, 2018 - 12:41
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Joined: 1 month 3 weeks ago

Im doing 2. Spanish and Italian. Spanish I have studied for 2 years just at home and italian for 4 months. I would have struggled to do both at the same time two years ago but having learned quite a bit of one, it feels easier to add another. One thing that has helped a lot is to have a voice for each..So in spanish I have a character in mind to emulate and in Italian another one.

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