LociInTheSky

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LociInTheSky's picture
About me: 

2070 binary in 10m(p)
000000006 in 10m(a)
Card adjustments:help,hitcher(s),hitch(o),heygirl(unchanged),heyb*tch(pulledbyhairbutnotdraggedonfloor,hide.

Consciousness is a flip book. You flip through an ordered bunch of still pictures fast enough and you wind up with a perception of a movie that is so much greater than the sum of its parts. Nevertheless, those (still frames) are its parts, and its only parts. No matter how hard you look at any of the frames, or any combination of the frames, you can never detect motion. Motion is undetectable because it is truly absent. The only one thing other than the raw parts is needed to create this greater-than-sum "movie" of consciousness is that the ordered parts must be viewed one at a time in rapid succession. Some action potential caused by an object flying across your field of vision, completely lacks consciousness. The neuron fires, and it is clear that there is no consciousness there, no more than you see consciousness in a spark caused by a battery. It is easy for us to find common ground and agree here. But then you say that therefore there must be something "additional" to create consciousness because the battery lacks consciousness but I do not. THAT is the mistake. There are no more parts but no more parts are required. It is not the parts themselves but their relationship to the others and their successive occurrences. There must only be a sufficiently complex and orderly network of sparks. If those conditions were met, the battery would indeed be conscious.

http://mt.artofmemory.com/forums/a-great-game-for-tons-of-memory-palaces

Sing, my angel of music! Sing for ME!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=8UYg16RNY-I

Aug30:
3nat minus S,W,C&C = 6270.519, projected total=10450.865
LocilinNat minus S W C&C = 5912.514, total=10063.514
Aug 28 (M/W style)
PrBl:
Shadows: 30m
Binaries: 5:40, 508
Cards: 2 failures @25, success at 26.75
HD, free: 96/99/105
Speed#'s: 312/(405safe)
Conclusion: ******* sucked.

Spoken:
90/90
180/180
144/270 (got lost there, NO MORE QUITTING ALLOWED; GETTING BACK ON TRACK IS THE SKILL TO HAVE)
21/222/360 - yes I got off, but before that and after that was still god-awful. Have to try 2/locus again.
109/445/450. - forgot several, figured them out but messed up one. The blank that was remaining (I had gotten to 809) I was able to recall at 974, but it took several more minutes to get there.
60/63 - I know I said no quitting but I plain ****** up at 60 so why continue to 540, I have limited time.

Prep Block: HD (quick/slow/free cycles daily); Card-pair read through, Kings, Face-2nd's, & Shadows; Binary, full shuffled read-thru 2x; Speed cards 2x; Nose in KTK's Book (90m)

Block A: 15m Words, 3x (90m)
Block B: Spoken @ 3/locus, 90, 180, 270, 360, 450, & 540 (90m)
Block C: 15m AI, 2x (90m)
Block D: 30m Binary, 2x, overview and analysis (90m)
Block E: 60m Cards, overview and analysis (90m)
Block F: 60m Digits, overview and analysis (90m)
Block G: Speed#'s, 5x (90m)
Block H: 15m#'s; 5m Binary; 5m Words (90m)
Block I: 15m N&F, 3x (90m)
Block J: 60m Cards, pasteboard, paper recall (180m)60m Digits, paper, recall: (180m)
Block K: 30m Binary, paper, recall: (120m)
Block L: 60m Digits, paper, recall: (180m)

Monday/Wednesday: 10.5 hours

(1)Speed#'s, 5x (90m)
(breakfast)
(2)15m Words, 3x (90m)
(rest)
(3)Spoken @ 3/locus, 90, 180, 270, 360, 450, & 540 (90m)
(rest)
(4)HD; Card read-thru, Kings, Face-2nd's & Shadows; Binary, shuffled read-thru 2x; Speed cards 2x; KTK's Book (90m)
(lunch->distract the mind)
(5)30m Binary, overview and analysis; 15m AI (90m)
(rest)
(6)60m Cards, overview and analysis (90m)
(dinner->distract the mind)
(7)15m N&F, 3x (90m)
(sleep)

Tuesday/Thursday: 10.5 hours

(1)Speed#'s, 5x (90m)
(breakfast)
(2)15m Words, 3x (90m)
(rest)
(3)15m AI, 2x (90m)
(rest)
(4)HD; Card read-thru, Kings, Face-2nd's & Shadows; Binary, shuffled read-thru 2x; Speed cards 2x; KTK's Book (90m)
(lunch->distract the mind)
(5)30m Binary; Spoken 100, 200, 470 (90m)
(rest)
(6)60m Digits, overview and analysis (90m)
(dinner->distract the mind)
(7)15m N&F, 3x (90m)
(sleep)

Friday: 9 hours 10 minutes

(1)Speed#'s, 5x (90m)
(breakfast)
(2)5m Binary; 5m N&F; 5m Words; Spoken 100, 200, 470 (100m)
(rest)
(3)HD; Card read-thru, Kings, Face-2nd's & Shadows; Binary, shuffled read-thru 2x; Speed cards 2x; KTK's Book (90m)
(lunch->distract the mind)
(4)60m Cards, pasteboard, paper recall (180m)
(chill -> dinner)
(5)15m N&F 3x: (90m)
(sleep)

Saturday: 9.5 hours

(1)HD; Card read-thru, Kings, Face-2nd's & Shadows; Binary, shuffled read-thru 2x; Speed cards 2x; KTK's Book (90m)
(breakfast)
(2)15m N&F, 3x (90m)
(rest)
(3)30m Binary, paper, recall: (120m)
(lunch->distract the mind)
(4)60m Digits, paper, recall: (180m)
(dinner->distract the mind)
(5) 15m Words; Spoken 100, 200, 470 (90m)
(sleep)

NEW 15m WORDS PB: Should have been 231 in 14:15 (-5% time). Did 200. In review, focused on semantically relating between loci. Then worked up to 220. Review again with same objective paying closer attention for synonyms and word form this time. Work up to 240. Then had about 4:40 left to review, which I did ACTIVELY and very well, identifying a handful of would-be mistakes, and got all the way to the 200+'s before having to speed up a bit, and I didn't speed up enough to get to 240 sadly, just 232.

3: "Its so interesting to read about this, i do not usually talk with people who understand the jargong so its really fun to talk about this
I understand the jonas approach, i have considered it but it really is not my thing... I want to get to the point where i can smash world records like everytime i compete, not just 4 digits but major improvments.
My problem is confidence, i do not usually do well during competition compared to hometraining... But I guess that will come with time?
I tackle marathon stuff differently:
1. If i havent trained for a long time ( wont happen from here on!) i always do recall to "boost" my concentration. But when I can recall easily and within the timeframe sometimes i do not do it at all:)
2. I usually have a 2:1 ratio between memory and recall, like memorize digits for 40 minutes then use the last 20 for recall. But when I feel that it did not go as planned or i was tired i do not do the recall part either...
- with this i cut down the 3h workloud to anywhere between 40 and 60 minutes.
I am also on the "only WMC" track, I talked to Yanja the other day and I confessed that she could have the swedish crown and that I was aiming for the world... But I have a pride problem so i would really like to be swedish champion too...

Personally i do not like drilling...
When i train i just do the events... Like they are
I feel the more events i do everyday the more i improve, like they amplify each other. But some events that go fast and where the images are "naturally" bad like spoken, sp cards and sp numbers i can usually use the same eventloci 2-3 times per day, and even if i do not usually do more then 2 trials sp numbers per day it happens.
Back to drilling: i can "easily" do 24 dates in 30s and that makes it very frustrating when i can not do 160 dates in 5 min!!! So my bread and butter is State of mind and Pacing.
The state of mind is like trying to be calm and not stressed/ tense in order to keep the pace. And the pace is to no fall behind and not burn out.
This is a really big thing for me, i do not remember exactly but i think my binaries went up like 2400/2800/3200/3600/4000/4500
Just like that, and it all comes down(for me) to keep calm and just keep the pace, like checking the time for every page and see if you keep a good pace
My biggest goals right now are the 600 digits in speed and 600 abstracts... And I have the pace, but it is really hard to keep calm and just breath while you look at the digits... And kill the urge to go faster, go back to an image or spend more time at a locus:)
Any thoughts on my thoughts ?
Ps. Why is the hours on names and faces waisted?? I feel i should but down more ours to get the habbit going??? But I am really more of a digits guy!"

Me: "How have you been spending these 5 hours each day?"
3: "1. One trial historical, 2x sp digits, 2x sp cards
2. 1-3 spoken with different digits from 90-450 and 5-15 min abstracts.
5 min when trying something new like the nee look twice 600 speed.
3. Practice my card system... Add two decks everytime, currently 10, aiming for 30.
4. 15 min numbers or 30 min binary
5. 15 names and faces or 15 min words"

Me: "I have 6 more questions though, to get a complete picture of your routine: 1) No hour digits? 2) When you say you skip 15m#'s some days, that means that some days you skip 15m #'s AND binary? 3) How often do you do 5m N&F, words, and 5m binary? 4) When you practice speed numbers and cards, since you do two trials of each, what is your mentality about the individual trials? If you are only doing two decks, it is smart to do one at >90% certainty and another as fast as possible, perhaps, for example. What are your intentions for those? 5) Most importantly: Do you try to get the same scores for each discipline each each day? How do you decide how much to attempt? and finally 6) There is a critical threshold above which the target quantity is so high that attempts at these quantities inevitably result in lower scores. So if I started attempting 600 speed numbers only, every time, my average speed# score would drop sharply. This is a frightening prospect when I am training for championships. How does this fact affect your training?"

3: "1. I workout up to 3200 digits this summer, my 2500 record was because i juggled two loci so everything afterward became wrong... Then i lost interest!!! And i guess i wanted to practice the 15 minutes before the swedish championship
So yes, right now only 15 min!
2. Nono, binary is still a gamble, it takes tremendous effort to get to 4500 and i am aimning for 4800 so i need to practice the pacing regulary... Only skip digits.
3. Thats the thing, after talking to you i almost feel 100% sure i should skip them... I need to make major improvments in names so i think the 15min will strengthen my 5 min anyway... And i dont like words since i do not have a swedish word generator... Need to xmt 50/ time and the words are not very... WMC
I think i can safe 800-900 binaries, but if i want to reach my goal of 1200 then i need to put in some work... But right now nothing.
4. Have not thought about that... My first trial usually feels more comfortable and usually get better scores but i use both trials to try reaching 600 digits/25s respectively.
If i get everything correct in those i feel that i went too slow...
5. I try to imorove everyday, in everything. In historical that is recalling more dates, in sp numbers it is keeping calm longer while trying to reach 600 and cards... Add more decks. But generally improve everytime. I feel like i can do this since i have the speed but am unable to keep it up all the way.
6. I have not thought about that either... Maybe the difference is that i feel that 600 is within my grasp if i can manage to keep calm( mostly for the first 3 minutes)... I think for me it would be like training with 720 digits and that would be too fast for me... Makes sense? 600 is like a close goal for me, if i make it at the swedish championship i guess i would make 40 digits increase to get up to 720...
I guess what i am trying to say is that i have the speed in all events, i just need to stay calm and hold it for the time out. I do not train to increase my speed per se"

Tripledeck:
1) 3:55, one blank. 2:35 to encode, 1:20 to review. 3/locus
2) 3:28, 24 blanks but very easily filled, dirty palace was distracted... 2/locus
3) 3:19 w/ metronome, 3/locus, got dizzied on the last deck, blanks there but none on the first two.
4)

I'm ranked #1 in the US and currently hold the national records for:
Speed numbers, 5m binary, Abstract, Historic dates, and 10 minute cards. I'll try to get some of the longer disciplines' records too when I get to try them out at the WMC in December!
===================
A BRILLIANT PRINCIPLE:
===================
OBJECTS CAN BE DESIGNATED TO DISTINCTLY AFFECT THE PALACE. AS MANY EFFECTS AS CAN BE IMAGINED CAN RETROACTIVELY IDENTIFY OBJECTS IN THIS WAY. SIMILAR TO THE S.A.M.
August 12:
Binary:3
Cards:1
Digits:1

Crazy Digits experiment: 3,840. 133.3BPM, seven blocks @3:2=42:00, switch to 80 BPM for 7 blocks:14m. 4 minutes and one block remaining. Since 4 minutes isn't enough time and 133.3 is impossible, just do 134BPM.
Reasonable Digits training strategy worth trying:
6 blocks, 114.28BPM = 42min.
So you must use: 115BPM = <42min
Secondary metronome at 80BPM = 2m/Bl = +12min = T+<54m. >3:00 to lock down the remaining block leaving ~3 minutes unused.
115BPM also works for binary. 3 seven minute blocks, then review all, leaves something like 2:00.
August 7:
Binary: 2= (-[surface=160]-[(?)=627]-[(??)=354,206]-[(food)=212]-[(617)=100]-[(?)=637]-[(???)=253,673,232]-[(?)=220]-[(075)=047]-[(?)=206]-[(?)=422]-[(violentwoman)=263]-[(?)=756]-[(??)=347,525]-[(condiment)=605]-[(?)=157]-[(violentwoman)=556]-[(?)=640]-[(?)772]-[(?)=142]-[(shitImage)=605,526]-[(?)247,035,072]-[(?)=741)]-[(??)=703,773]-[(gun)=722]-[(?)=746]-[(?)=746]
Cards: 1
Digits : 0
August 8:
100 BPM to end at 54:36 at the moss, 110 to end by the mummy's tomb. With a physical penalty of two per pile, we end at 57:36. 2:30 is already my pace roughly, so hone that as well.

Intuitions:
Box of medium size: 452, 821, 456
PROJECTILE: 092!!!!
758- Clifford, the big red dog.
NEW SPEED NUMBERS:
Plan A: Do what you did for Sam's beginning with 014627028107 and ending where you took the picture for XMT. Work like hell on the secondary skill and allot special palaces. Like serendipity, 464 is the minimum raw score needed for speed#s to be neutral this year, so that will be the minimum. And now there's one more WR to get.
Memorize many, and don't memorize a second longer than 2:50. Zoom close to link. Tried 392 at 2:30, too fast apparently, missed 2 lines, 19 seconds remaining. Tried 360 a second time, also huge screw up. Even 320 is enough to hit my goals this year though.
==================
Strap on the Footcleats and beat them all in a row.
==================
75
386
24
45
399
11
27
16
39* (most difficult; most important)
28
Condiments/paints: 426, 682, 259, 661, 831, 347, 049, 562
Projectiles, character: include 277 638 331, 490, etc
Character, standing: 996, 762, 097, 030, 663, 382
Character, push-forward: 001, 012, 030, 331, 553
Fly/hover (characters + nonliving)
Food/pluralities
Fire/Elemental
Liquid
Large
Small
Structural
Vehicular
Small (to be interacted with) 927, 032, 674, 349,041,
Attire/Accessories: 732, 167, 427, 026, 149, 060, 500, 804, 802, 039, 751, 803,916, 026
Land:300,735,982,985,338,420,970,870,533,648,017,430,025,057,548,647,007,734,061,417,698,052,079,714,069
Mindful animals:007,079,061,038,029,035,047,074,085,
Crawlie:025,057,548,549,533,848,629,918,711,089,219,723
Floatie:393,311,275,288,888,482,629,848,637,000,053,014,015,016,044,091,093,094,099
Plural:003
HOW TO DO 15m N&F:
Each pic starts with taking a second to look at the face. Don't even bother to look at the name until you can tell that you'll recognize this face the next time around. I did 30, review (90 seconds), again, again, then looked over all 90 pretty quickly. Again. Then looked over all 120 again. For names 120-150, I picked about only about 4 or 5 people with the easy-as-pie names. I looked carefully, but never got around to reviewing these. Still remembered most of them. Remembered 124 names and misspelled 22. Most of the errors were name endings. Putting ova instead of 'ov' or vise versa, or Pandos instead of Pandov, Giorgios instead of Giorgio, Adokies Atasier instead of Adokie Atasie. I do not pay attention to name endings well. Anyway, this is the way to do it. Naturally I slowed down as I went further on which probably isn't good, my reviews were closer to active than the fast-as-blazes I usually prefer but I don't know if that was a good thing either. Stick with this method since 15faces/page at WMC.

On 5 5m RW PB, I did 2/locus (100), which I think took about 2.5m and they stuck well enough for me to start with a semi-active review right away, which I suppose took 1.5m, (it is important to be able to go active ASAP in order to cement word-forms). Second semi-active I think I had about 1:05 to begin, which got me up to the 94th word (forgot 95th and remembered the rest). If I hadn't wasted those TWO seconds looking at words 101 & 102 during first semi-active, I'd have had all 100.

July 16: to get
100: 4 tries!
200:
=====================
Friddish
=====================
vase
rattles*
moose'*
laces*
movie reel
titan
tickottage*
tile
nose
moss
==========================
Boomark
==========================
Disk
rattles*
moose*
Laces*
Roger
tongue
tickottage*
taffy
roll
nail
======================================
HOW TO MEMORIZE WORDS:
Memorize them 2/locus, try to keep it at about 1 per second REALLY try to see the images though it's not really possible all the time at least not yet, just try to keep the pace, I did 200. Then review as quickly as possible while semantically linking every word to the next or at a MINIMUM across every locus, and here is where you're going to have to insert the word form imagery most likely. Always try to predict though at first you probably won't be able to predict many at all so just focus on making those sentences. Repeat, repeat, repeat. I did this with 200 words and scored 195/195/200 making 5 singular words plural and during revision I almost changed two OTHER singular words to plural, so don't know why I have this tendency when using this method but it absolutely needs to be taken care of. But for now the very most important thing is being able to mimic that run. I would say that encoding 200 words took about 3:45 and that I was able to review maybe 4 or 5 more times straight through, I think on the very last one I was trying to be a bit more active possibly? But you can figure out those kinds of details later, the important thing is to get them down quickly and then be able to make the sentences quickly and then review gets easier and easier. Recall of the 200 words took 480 seconds. So 2.4 seconds per word. I simply flew through it. I need FAR more loci so I could do this 3 times in a row. Review was so UNBELIEVABLY solid, this is the ONLY WAY you ever need to memorize words from here on out, and you can be GREAT at it - even now recall was so easy that I don't see why 220 would have felt any different as long as I could keep the encoding pace, even 240! (maybe I should have gone FASTER during encoding, as if the sentences are what is truly important and the images are essential to note the word forms). Just experiment with this method and you've got this in the bag. Was 036 put 050 - 60

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Livan's story
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With the balls his feet planted firmly on the front edge of his seat, his heels lift up from his chair, his chin lifts up from his knees; his bottom lip is absently allowed to snap back into place as he readies his hand. His eyes are like saucers. The waiter is alerted to a slight increase in his heart rate as he approaches the party, all but one smartly dressed. His body responds to the shape and posture of this looming manimal; it is some survival mechanism, a reaction to this feral figure poised as if to pounce into the table like some large jungle cat. The silver tray is lowered steadily until it is a foot above the table, and his heart skips a beat. At this moment, he is stricken by the sight of Livan plunging his entire body forward with explosive speed - drawn like a magnet to the sweetest thing in the room - two bony elbows pointing outward and ten digits curled into talons. Without thinking, the waiter lets go of the tray which falls to the table with a startling clink. His arm retracts in a blur, as if being pulled back by some invisible spring. (He forgave himself for this embarrassing mishap later that day as he reflected on the incident and noted that he had only dropped the tray because he feared for the safety of his dominant hand, and it is reasonable to take measures to ensure that his dominant hand remains attached to his favorite wrist. The sound of the tray hitting the table had turned every head in the room, but luckily nothing had spilled. He would forget the whole thing in time.) Livan inhales deeply now, electing to exercise patience just long enough to identify his choice berry. Together, his thumb and forefinger are a water witch, quivering with anticipation as they glide to hover each berry, one at a time, preparing to dip down. It is seen. It is unmistakeable. It seems to him a faint gold haze hangs around it. It is pure. It is the Virgin Berry. The rest of the room has already faded out of his consciousness, all senses dedicated to absorb the Truth in the berry just before his dark eyes. He plucks it, tilts his head back; he holds this beautiful, blessed berry above his gaping mouth. In this final moment, a single tear escapes his eye for his fortune and felicity. He releases the berry. It goes down the wrong pipe and he chokes and dies, the end.
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Was 406 put 673 - 75
Was 046 put 777 - 75
Was 105 put 764 - 75
Was 517 put 777 - 45
Was 560 put 777 - 60
Was 411 put 104 - 75
+ 9 over 4410 = 3864, PB over 3813 :)
3240 3x then 1171, though I was hoping for 1350 and absolutely could have done that since I had over 7 minutes remaining. Spent like two minutes on the first 360 :/. But I did 1171, and froze a bit, and still made 2 errors. So if I do hour digits or something and still want to work on binary a little, do 8 minute binary - never 5 min for the next 5 months. If I can get 1350 in 8 minutes on lock, we're talking 4590. For variety, alternate this drill with 3x ASAP. Working on those individually will take less time and will probably yield better results from just repeating 30m binary, but I think I should do the three in a row in perfect rotation. I have time to do it in spite of the fact that binary is less than half as important as the others. Fitting since according to the plan above, I'll spend a little less than half of the time on it :)

HC3/L=27 Beamont
1)48.23
(Next time, single review on third group)

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480 z151827392
2) 1.800.526.4848 s151821666
3) 1.877.222.1813 ????????
4) 1.855.251.9737 ????????

July, avg of past 3 scores:
Speed#s
a254
b353
c163 = 260

HD:
117
108.5
118.5 =114.66
d121.5Free= 116.666

15m N&F
a87
b111
c70 = 89.33
d95 = 92

AI
a388
b386
c439 = 404.333

15mW HARSH SCORING
135
b214
c78 = 142.33
d145 = 145.66

Speed cards:
a)34.234

Spoken 100
a100

Spoken 200
a200

Spoken 450
a450
Speed cards(e), instant recall: 27.168
Best: 22.044
Hour Digits Beaumont Loop:
Trial 1:
1a4:04
1b1:59
2a:4:02
2b2:08
3a4:32
3b2:33
4a4:43
4b3:39
5a5:39
5b3:11
6a:5:04
6b4:34
7a4:46
7b3:09
Total, 54:44.
Clearly cannot loop or else add major time to internal reviews

Binary Sprints:
180: 19.5
270:
360:

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

Hello, my name's Lance. I'm ranked #1 in the US and #10 in the world. It is best to contact me through a private message on this site.

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

Binary group 1:
000,001,002,004,
010,011,012,014,
020,021,022,024,
040,041,042,044,
100,101,102,104,
110,111,112,114,
120,121,122,124,
140,141,142,144,
200,201,202,204,
210,211,212,214,
220,221,222,224,
240,241,242,244,
400,401,402,404,
410,411,412,414,
420,421,422,424,
440,441,442,444
Binary group 2:
300,301,302,304,
310,311,312,314,
320,321,322,324,
340,341,342,344,
500,501,502,504,
510,511,512,514,
520,521,522,524,
540,541,542,544,
600,601,602,604,
610,611,612,614,
620,621,622,624,
640,641,642,644,
030,031,032,034,
050,051,052,054,
060,061,062,064,
130,131,132,134,
150,151,152,154,
160,161,162,164,
230,231,232,234,
250,251,252,254,
260,261,262,264,
430,431,432,434,
450,451,452,454,
460,461,462,464,
003,005,006,
013,015,016,
023,025,026,
043,045,046,
103,105,106,
113,115,116,
123,125,126,
143,145,146,
203,205,206,
213,215,216,
223,225,226,
243,245,246,
403,405,406,
413,415,416,
423,425,426,
443,445,446..
15 mins · Like
CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

003,005,006,013,015,016,023,025,026,043,045,046,103,105,106,113,115,116,123,125,126,143,145,146,203,205,206,213,215,216,223,225,226,243,245,246,403,405,406,413,415,416,423,425,426,443,445,446.
Reading, June 5th. (May was 700 month, though I didn't actually work on the digits)
9-60, 8-64, 2-62, 4-55!, 1-58, 0-65?!, 6-59, 7-49 ;),5 -55, 3-59
1b52,6b52,2b57,9b58,3b53,7b54,5b57,2b55,8b58,0b55
4c49,8c57,0c55,5c49,3c50,6c54,9c51,2c55,1c53,7c51
Required Palaces:
AI: 236 Hamilton - Second Warp at 27/200 Junk Fence
#1:61 (Sam's)
#2:61 (Beautanical)
SC1:13 (Reaper)
SC2:13 (Reaper2)
W:120-150 (???)
B: 174 (468x) Extend Bobcat 90
S1:17 (On the Go)
S2:34 (Hewdraw)
S3:75 (Beaumont)
C: 445 ([email protected]/L) OR 297 ([email protected]) Triplecrown is 117 deep.
D: 351 ([email protected]+240) The inside of HEB is my State Flats Doorstep.

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

Total: 1630
First card run, 8x8x8+1, blanks:1,1,3,1,4,0,2,1,0,0,0,2,1,0,0,0,8(in a row),0,2,0,0,0,0,3,?(last minute)
5/22/15 Fantasy
Basic 5: 4923.525
NS: 9835.422 June 19
NS: 10005 June 19
WMCS: 9120 May 29
WMCS: 9330 June 19
Image revisions:

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

=================
IMAGE ADJUSTMENTS
=================
IMAGE ADJUSTMENTS
=================
Work in: rockin katz, jumping up and throwing glove-ball.
Consider experimenting with replacing worst image, whatever it may be, regardless of all else.
Mistook 141 and 244, 141 corkscrews 244 is in a vertical group of 3, from bottom up, firetip, icetip, litetip.

073 - in permanent blizzard, leaves snowy footprints
093 - squirts bubbles out the front (J. Fresco) makes next buoyant

136 - Tom hides behind and Jerry collides with next
141 - corkscrews
160 - is now multiple plates spinning on 3 thin wooden poles of various heights, red yellow and blue plate.
188 - vanishes and reappears, changing to blue and red with its reappearances, stains next blue and red.

201 - when first, large enough to hold next
210 - enlarged, now of the "Bat" type
211 - Nodded - Jay Leno Bobble, affects with chin. (bat)
221- inhales; turns, shoots out game to hover above, crushed with blue paint pouring down (vsauce)
244 - now in a vertical group of three, elemental, bottom up: fire, ice, lite
267 - Large, spins like Goron's Giant vase, toots purple smoke in spurts
299 - is now the Jetson's green-face computer (with large twisty knob and many dials)

329 - large; 3 on edge rolling in a procession
330 - leaves unraveling trail behind, can wrap next
340 - grows as it bounces, finally hovers above and becomes smasher, flattening itself but leaving next protruding; "face" visible.
389 - Same, but multi-colored now. http://images.wisegeek.com/colored-moth-balls.jpg
390 - unrolls
397 - CONSUMES TOTALLY
398 - the Fantasia Mops, Mickey conducting from a rock

403 - bat
409 - explodes into all constituents, reconstitute around next
411 - Tie-dyed Flying V playing TD'd notes
445 - spins next
450 - top part continuously expands out into a huge doughy pool, which threatens to swallow.
451 - rolls *backward*, uppercuts next
452 - sound waves make it bulge, sound waves make air in front "fumey" and push next.
453 - does "the worm"
487 - Can see the "trails" of the green and pink glowsticks, BRIGHTLY colors next

538 - Stained glass explodes forward
543 - Goes effin' nuts, bouncing everywhere denting and cracking things, ESPECIALLY the loci themselves.
554 - Spike shoots off like little missle which he guides (like Ness) to next, which it sticks in like thorn, next grows hair
571 - Licked, ghastly licks and then purple Pit-poison (the angel) with little 1's ticking above like a damage counter.

600 - eyes roll up, stormy skies.
605 - Jostle = centrifugal astronaut training chamber thing, swinging wildly fast
609 - glowing bright
617 - leaves distinctive buckshot holes
657 - scribbles butterflies and flowers that take on a mind of their own.
674 - leapfrogging, or jumps next.
686 - two basemen cry and "vomit" blood steadily, topman does Pride pose and pinkish 444/catholicArt behind his head
687 - "Acid Cloud"

701 - enlarged, transformer
735 - previous balances on hump, spits drips off next.
741 - clubs fall off back onto next
767 - Spotlight on it, movies cartoon-ily bouncy up and down, cash trail out the exhaust
783 - drags previous, can manipulate next with toes.
784 - when first, large enough to hold next; drips, swivels 180 transformer
785 - creates 785 shaped dent

806 -> mouth opens wide, producer
810 - walks on next
838 - smacks with a loud WHACK!

913 - Batman still throws bat-star, but he jumps and glides like the video game to differentiate
953 - is now from sonic, including robomonkeys that toss orange "coconuts"
961 - Badged - big shiny police badge with sharp pin sticking out sticks to next
972- wraps, wrings, drips boiling grease
974 - when knocked over, all spin on edge and circle next, closing in on it.
982- COWS AND COWS AND COWS

2♠K♠ - incinerates what touches it, boils next

A♠K♣ - Tet - CheerUpCharliesHonestMiles

4♣K♠ - Nurse - has BP band that constricts when she pumps

K♣K♦ - Hah - Rockin' Cats Clown Dog

9♣Q♥ - Library, the book shelf shoots out books (Haunted, Mario 64)

K♠3♥ - Hoachm - Zebra rug, spins on floor lifts head and neighs, eyeballs shoot out and stick to next

K♣6♣ - making out with TGH tree, in full color, color leaves falling/flying

7♥2♥ - Scayn; shoots dispersing pink and yellow paper, as Brent. Hover, rain.
7♥5♥ - collapses into a pile of bones, sticky dust rises outward from impact
9♥3♥ - shoots bubbles out of TOP that make next buoyant (SHADOWS SHOULD COPY ACTION AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE)

8♥J♦ - Dayp, staggered (3 back 2 front) choreographed, pyro blinds, sticky sparks.
9♥A♦ - Taps; Riverdance
9♥2♦ - Tip; floats foward, bobs as if held, steady stream, clear hopper, nos jet out back
9♥10♦ - Toaps; grows up rapidly - Bat
9♥J♦ - Tayb, expands horizontally, rains in random spurts like audio bars
10♥2♦ - Dooz; expands all four ways, pigs hop in turn as Duz, Hovers above, Smasher
10♥5♦ - Tayce; spins as around finger, hangs on extremity**
10♥ 9♦ - Doost - filled with green glass bottles!
10♥10♦ - Daisk; projectiles stop dead on chains, chains extend, bind, throw AND spin

10♦K♥ - Neece - Falcon kick down, has burning, deflecting effect as in game.
4♦6♥ - The biting, attacking piano from Mario 64. Like mimic but bigger, slower, louder, clunkier.
3♦10♥ - Norm is now Dood turtles in current, carries.
3♦4♥ - Naim opens out like a paper fortune-teller, producer.
9♦8♥ - Naypth is now "molotov cocktail"
6♦K♥ - Nech - Now the entire painting/tableau
9♦6♥ - Noop - Jamie shakes head "no," is a huge ringpop.

10♦K♣ - Mas - Stretch armstrong w brass knuckles instead of Brad
5♦3♣ - Puddy from Seinfeld, shorts short like a boyscout.
6♦10♣ - Jaish - Kevin James and Torso
6♦7♣ - Moach - Busts thru, HUGE BLINKY EYES, makes next "swirly"
2♦J♣ - Mainp - clown with rainbow wig riding zig-zag on a ridiculously small car with green headlights
6♦A♣ - Majt - two helmet-less astronauts holding hands and rotating as Jeef
7♦3♣ - Maygm - Robotnik lava vomit, similar to 687
8♦5♣ - Moovl - swivels, not to be confused with Moof,8♦K♣
J♦3♣ - Thorm is now Whomp from Mario 64
J♦K♣ - Fom - billowing seafoam.
Q♦6♣ - Airmch - 4 of Ogletree's pink chairs arranged as dominoes as "this too shall pass"
K♦6♣ - HomeJack :)
K♦J♣ - Hayf - paper-cutout people (like paper snowflake, extends)

4♥Q♣ - Rel - Katamari Damacy!!
9♥Q♣ - Lib - The sliding ladder is on tracks, two horizontal silver bars
2♥K♣ - Lan - Curling (duhhhhh)

2♥5♠ - Object leans AGAINST -> Chan -> next is ATOP chan
2♥8♠ - Chayn! Huge chain links.
7♥K♠ - Shayg does SNES Mario Cape

3♦8♦ - Caymf - NIGHTCRAWLER
6♦A♦ - Gauge - springs up like Megaman booby

8♦A♠ - Bayth swallows previous, producer
Q♦3♠ - Rob - bank robber w pig-cigar mask, big bags full of cash
K♦2♠ - Haybin - huuuge hay bin.
=================
IMAGE ADJUSTMENTS
=================
IMAGE ADJUSTMENTS
=================

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737
CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737

Abstract:
NEED UPDATED IMAGES FOR DARK MIRROR, SOAR, AND TOOCH
Twisted Mirror: KATAMARI DAMACY (OMG FINALLY!! :D :D )
Loab is now "Pah."
(1)his hatch opens (producer)
(2)Features can slide around or explode off,
World spins next
Nest moves to catch previous (even into the air as if held like a baseball glove by invisible player) hits ground and grows to contain next.
"Magic Eye" is now "Catacomb"
"Tesh" is now "MAIDEN" producer/transformer The dark version is now "Schwaym" (IGNORE THIS FOR NOW; LIGHT VERSION MAY NOT EXIST
"Dif" is now "Sayk," imprints next.
Dark twisted: Noosh, cracks from previous, cane-cues next. Dark straight: Net, falls on next or jerks up previous. white+straight: Rex, catches previous with little arms, chomps next. White+twisted: talon, swings like claw game from previous, grasps next. Light/gray nut - large nutshell; producer
Rope is now a lasso, "noose" around previous, slings previous into next, or lasso's and trips next
Paint bucket throws orange paint
Nalp streaks yellow paint, dripping (Memaw's lemon picture)
Bowtie spins toward - when it attaches, it is between object and me, and it cartwheels object.
KATAMARI DAMACY?
Vase, when smashed, can reconstitute and flip upside down. (producer)
Rayg...electrically stuns/paralyzes with little arcs running up and down next
Avacado's front half opens and pit shoots like Taf projectile if first. Producer
Rim hoops next as magician's levitation. Previous also jumps through hoop when appropriate
"Keel" is now "MIMIC," Destroyer
Rapt - LARGE neck flare, the spit tar is connected like a long tongue, it has its own teeth and jaws.
Tar river ; previous falls into as quicksand; wraps and stains next (as Abyss)
Char is now Enber, glowing hot with small licking flames; crawls like conveyor belt
Rain is lightning rain (D3)
Falls are now GUD
TV pops; ring goes above next as halo, descends, binds.
Tidal wave is wave of piranhas.
Sand has 'squarewhirlpool', swallows previous in a swirl, spits next up in an arc with a sand trail.
Mona inhales and swallows previous then turns around; producer/transformer
Cavern - Winks, swivels, drips (producer/transformer)
Casp smashes next with enormous head
Hairp makes next hairy
Raft first self-inflates
golfball can grow to dad's study XL (producer)
If stairs are first, they point *down*
Whirl causes mirroring part of next to magically swirl
Coom's appendages impale from both sides in an "X" to differentiate from Thik which binds in a double helix
"Thorm" is now "Whomp" or "Boms" if twisted

Rhino causes next to flip end over end; while
Loams causes next to be batted in an impossible zig-zag fashion.
-------------------NAYPTH------------------what was snow/sparks, is now NAYPTH, molotov cocktail.
Schweif towel-whips next with schweif
Chance comes out of backgammon tossers and sticks to next as "snake eyes"
Strawberry unravels as a globe becoming a map, enlarges and wraps around next.
Snof - 1, 2, 3, or 4 Snofs zigzag downward (based on serial position)
Cootr extends out ultra long neck and chomps
Mairb raises onto one corner and spins; bat
"Nalj" is now "Link" -> if Link is first, hookshot up, then down+b sword-smash
"Fik" is now "Faik"
Keeng is now Vik
Nair is now Legolas.
Mesh is now Nik if twisted.
ESPECIALLY IF 2/LOCUS, Torn is itself if first, but if second, the first object whirls furiously and becomes a tornado.
Object preceding Witch can become her broom.
If sack is first, transformer
Chan can jut or stretch to obtrude.
Pond is now Chicken
Poms is now Boofr
Culch is Culch again, litmus if twisted
Map is now meln IF TWISTED
Fog is now Lasko. Dices prev ious, turns quickly and blows detritus into next, gust moves next.
Res is now Mayms or Maym if twisted, The off-shade is Res : master these
Fanf is now Siren, drenches red
Tire is now tires if twisted
Moon is now 325, face as De Lune, drenches cool blue
Tils - when previous touches, previous shoots backward.
Cult - Lobs next in an arc. Previous is dropped in the path of the empty arm, which releases and smacks it line-drive
=56 images adjusted 7/21/15

nest catches then turns 180 and ejects next (transformer)
CALL THESE FOUR NUMBERS
1) 1.877.488.9480
2) 1.800.526.4848
3) 1.877.222.1813
4) 1.855.251.9737
Memory Roll:
93 / 547
3400 / 850
2641 / 943
341 / 675
480 / 878
111 / 888
0 / 0
214 / 778
240 / 801
32.9 / 329
________
7174
10/44.85/645/ 7005
6/106/158m/848 6965

10 cards: 0:01.62
Download Tobacco

000,001,002,003,004,005,006,007,008,009,010,011,012,013,014,015,016,017,018,019,
020,021,022,023,024,025,026,027,028,029,030,031,032,033,034,035,036,037,038,039,
040,041,042,043,044,045,046,047,048,049,050,051,052,053,054,055,056,057,058,059,
060,061,062,063,064,065,066,067,068,069,070,071,072,073,074,075,076,077,078,079,
080,081,082,083,084,085,086,087,088,089,090,091,092,093,094,095,096,097,098,099,
100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,
120,121,122,123,124,125,126,127,128,129,130,131,132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,
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240,241,242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255,256,257,258,259,
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380,381,382,383,384,385,386,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396,397,398,399,
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420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427,428,429,430,431,432,433,434,435,436,437,438,439,
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480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490,491,492,493,494,495,496,497,498,499,
500,501,502,503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514,515,516,517,518,519,
520,521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537,538,539,
540,541,542,543,544,545,546,547,548,549,550,551,552,553,554,555,556,557,558,559,
560,561,562,563,564,565,566,567,568,569,570,571,572,573,574,575,576,577,578,579,
580,581,582,583,584,585,586,587,588,589,590,591,592,593,594,595,596,597,598,599,
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620,621,622,623,624,625,626,627,628,629,630,631,632,633,634,635,636,637,638,639,
640,641,642,643,644,645,646,647,648,649,650,651,652,653,654,655,656,657,658,659,
660,661,662,663,664,665,666,667,668,669,670,671,672,673,674,675,676,677,678,679,
680,681,682,683,684,685,686,687,688,689,690,691,692,693,694,695,696,697,698,699,
700,701,702,703,704,705,706,707,708,709,710,711,712,713,714,715,716,717,718,719,
720,721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732,733,734,735,736,737,738,739,
740,741,742,743,744,745,746,747,748,749,750,751,752,753,754,755,756,757,758,759,
760,761,762,763,764,765,766,767,768,769,770,771,772,773,774,775,776,777,778,779,
780,781,782,783,784,785,786,787,788,789,790,791,792,793,794,795,796,797,798,799,
800,801,802,803,804,805,806,807,808,809,810,811,812,813,814,815,816,817,818,819,
820,821,822,823,824,825,826,827,828,829,830,831,832,833,834,835,836,837,838,839,
840,841,842,843,844,845,846,847,848,849,850,851,852,853,854,855,856,857,858,859,
860,861,862,863,864,865,866,867,868,869,870,871,872,873,874,875,876,877,878,879,
880,881,882,883,884,885,886,887,888,889,890,891,892,893,894,895,896,897,898,899,
900,901,902,903,904,905,906,907,908,909,910,911,912,913,914,915,916,917,918,919,
920,921,922,923,924,925,926,927,928,929,930,931,932,933,934,935,936,937,938,939,
940,941,942,943,944,945,946,947,948,949,950,951,952,953,954,955,956,957,958,959,
960,961,962,963,964,965,966,967,968,969,970,971,972,973,974,975,976,977,978,979,
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aa - aardvark
ab - abacus
ac - ac unit
ad - calculator
ae - eagle
af - afro
ag - aggie helmet
ah - Krum (AHH)
ai - I robot
aj
ak - ak 47
al - weird al
am - alarm
an - ant
ao -
ap - apple
aq - aquarium
ar - Rag (arkansas)
as - ass (mule)
at -
au - Gold
av - Aviators
aw - cute puppy
ax - ax
ay - pirate
az - Cayct

ba - sheep
bb - bb gun
bc - christ
bd - bed
be - bee
bf - boof
bg - bug
bh
bi - bike
bj
bk - "The King"
bl - balloon
bm - Bomb
bn - Ben
bo - Borg
bp - Oil rig
bq - bbq
br - Bear
bs - Bus
bt - Bat
bu - bull
bv - beaver
bw - bow
bx - box
by -
bz - Buzz

ca - coalf
cb - cab
cc - Leel
cd - CD's
ce - Celt (kelt)
cf - coof
cg - cig
ch - Chee
ci -
cj - Caj
ck - Louis CK Maich
cl - Club
cm - Camera
cn - Candle
co - coalr (CO)
cp - chanf
cq - CQ (nicoderm)
cr - Cricket
cs - Cass (cuffs)
ct - Cot
cu - Cupboard
cv - Cavern
cw -
cx -
cy - Cyborg
cz -

da - dam
db -
dc - white house
dd - tits
de - Deedee
df - Daffy
dg - dugtrio
dh - doublehelix
di - dildo
dj - 106
dk - donkey kong
dl - dollar
dm - Dome
dn - Dane
do - Dodo
dp - daft punk
dq - DQ Blizzard
dr - Doctor (Naip)
ds - pess
dt - Fom (delerium tremens)
du - duck
dv - Devil
dw - Mountain Dew
dx - Lelsym DXM
dy -
dz - ball pit (discovery zone)

ea - earth
eb -
ec - Echo (dolphin)
ed - 887
ee - EEG
ef -
eg - egg
eh -
ei - Eiffel
ej - Straight-edge (right angle metal thing)
ek -
el - Elle
em - M&Ms
en -
eo - Eeyore
ep - Epigraph (Doan)
eq - Equalizer
er - Aymb
es -
et - ET
eu -
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ex -
ey - eye
ez - EZ cheese

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This article was originally a talk given at the Piper's Gathering in Burlington, Vermont, in August 2011, which is why the article includes comments from the floor. It has a lot of generalizations about practicing, because I intended to demonstrate specifics at the end of the talk, drawing from examples of practice problems given by the participants. Unfortunately, we ran out of time, and didn't get to any specific examples! So the examples which illustrate the general principles articulated in this article will be forthcoming in a future talk.

It takes a long time, and a lot of careful practice, to get really good at playing music (in case you haven't noticed). So it's important to be as efficient as possible with your practice time. Even though there are no shortcuts, there are plenty of possibilities for wasting time! This talk is about making the best use of scarce practice time. I'll focus primarily on developing technique rather than musicianship, because musicianship can take so many different forms, and developing technique is probably a universal neurological phenomenon. (Musicianship is very important, of course, and we must always try to integrate our musical sense into whatever passages we are struggling with technically.)

I go into great detail here, because I find that it helps to understand the learning process. If we understand the process, we can trust it, and can apply ourselves consistently and patiently, knowing that results will come with time. It's an irony that the more patient we are, the faster we progress. Hence attitude is extremely important, and in several ways. Efficient practicing requires very good concentration, and a temperament which is patient-but-enthusiastic, alert-but-relaxed, and inquisitive is ideal for fostering good concentration. Trusting the process rather than questioning yourself allows you to focus on the job at hand, and not distract yourself with second-guessing, whether of yourself or of the learning process.

Some of the best musicians I know have the same sort of attitude toward practicing as many have toward doing puzzles: they regard it as a fun, problem-solving exercise. If something isn't working, they slow it down and analyze the problem until they figure out how to fix it, and then drill the solution until it becomes second nature. Attitude is important—and attitude, along with concentration, also develops with practice.

Some of the concepts in this article can be applied on your own, and some are better applied with the help of a teacher. As I see it, there are three qualities needed to learn music without a teacher. First, you need to have a good ear, so you can really hear what's going on in the musical examples you are trying to emulate and can tell whether you are succeeding in copying them. You learn more quickly if there is a short feedback loop. Having a keen ear for imperfections, which allows you to fix them right away, is much more efficient than waiting until your weekly lesson and having a teacher point those imperfections out to you. The more quickly you catch things on your own, the faster you'll learn, and the better you'll be at getting along without a teacher. (And the ear also develops with practice!)

Second, you need to be able to analyze your own technique, so you can figure out the most efficient ways of getting the desired musical effects. This almost never works as well as having a teacher show you solutions to technical problems that are a result of generations of experience, but sometimes you still have to figure things out for yourself, because every combination of body, temperament, and musical taste is a little different. Your teacher can show you stuff, but can't determine what you want to do with music. You set your own goals, so ultimately you have to figure out how to reach them. The ideal is to have BOTH a good teacher and an ability to analyze your own technique.

Third, you need to understand your own learning style, and what works for you. While I will be talking about things that are pretty universal, the way we apply how we learn is individual.

In this talk, I also want to address the differences between older music practicers and younger ones. The main differences between older practicers and younger ones can be understood in terms of three: strength, muscle coordination, and memory. (Memory includes both muscle memory, which is related to coordination, and memory of musical ideas.) These 3 issues require different practice strategies for optimal development. For instance, strength issues are best dealt with like any muscle-building program—you exercise 3 times/week to build strength, and exercising more often doesn't do any good. Muscle coordination issues, on the other hand, are best developed by frequent repetition, alternating with rest periods. Daily practice is ideal for practice issues that are primarily muscle coordination. Memory issues are best worked on very frequently, reviewing something again and again, even several times a day, until it is thoroughly learned, and then coming back to it at gradually increasing time intervals.

The two biggest differences between older practicers and younger ones are: (1) older people's bodies recover much more slowly from vigorous exercise, and (2) memorization is slower and more difficult for older musicians. The young can practice strength issues every day and still improve without wearing down their bodies, and often don't require special strategies to aid in memory—it all comes more naturally. For older musicians, however, it's helpful to analyze musical problems in terms of strength issues, coordination issues, and memory issues, and to devise practice strategies that accommodate the optimal practice frequency of each. For example, most technique issues that involve the little finger are either strength issues, or coordination issues limited by strength issues. For strength issues, you would ideally design an exercise that you would practice at the end of a practice session (or practice segment), every other day or 3 times per week, just as you would lift weights. If the issue also had a coordination element, then you could practice that element more frequently, but more slowly, and with fewer or more widely spaced repetitions, in order to avoid fatiguing the muscles. An example of a practice strategy for issues involving memory would be to work on the memory component away from the instrument, so that memorization is engaged as frequently as possible while allowing the muscles to rest and rebuild.

So ideal practice regimens probably differ between age groups—I certainly know I have had to change my approach over the years. Younger players seem to improve quickly if you can keep them interested and focused, without much attention to practice method. College-age musicians are usually pretty focused but can err on the side of not having enough balance prudence in their practice, hence the high incidence of overuse injuries among college musicians. Something seems to change in the way we learn after age 30 or 35, and our old practicing methods become less and less effective.

As people enter middle age, they must be extremely conscious of stamina issues, and of the speed their bodies rebuild. I, for instance, didn't overhaul my practice method until my 40's, when, after a shoulder injury, I learned to practice again with the help of a physical therapist. After the overhaul, I made good progress in developing instrumental technique by practicing for several hours every other day, with many breaks. I have experimented with numerous departures from and alternatives to this schedule, to accommodate coordination and memory issues, but it continues to seem like a good basic plan. I quit playing four-hour contradances when I was 28 years old, because I would be extremely sore after playing bellows-pipes for such a long time, but now, at age 52, I'm back to playing four-hour dances. My stamina is now better than it was at age 28, and the reason is that I built up to it slowly, practicing every other day.

Who has had the experience of preparing for a competition or big performance, doing a somewhat disappointing job, putting the instrument away for a week, and then pulling it out and playing the piece perfectly? (Many hands go up.) What you were probably missing was the rest period. We need to manage our rest periods, in other words, scheduling both our practice and rest so that they work together, and making the whole process more efficient.

Before I get to my main point, I want to talk about multitasking. Music is multitasking: music is doing a lot of things at once. You have to blow and finger at the same time, listen and play, listen to yourself and listen to others, listen to yourself and read music. We have to train ourselves to do seemingly dozens of things simultaneously. You need an efficient method to learn to integrate lots of activities into one activity, and then you will learn everything more quickly. As teachers, we often see students trying to add another element too soon, and then everything falls apart.

But while our bodies are multitasking, our attention can really only be in one place at a time. What happens is that we learn to shift our attention from one thing to another so quickly that we think we're thinking about several things at once. It's helpful to understand how this process works, because then we can devise exercises to develop it much more efficiently.

The classic example is playing the piano. You learn to play with two hands at once by first learning a part for one hand, then for the other, and then very slowly putting them together. There are a lot of situations in the instrumental music world that benefit from this basic approach. Playing a difficult technique in a musical context is a lot like doing two things at once, because your mind has to pay attention to both the technique and the musical idea. A difficult technical passage often throws us off musically, because we don't integrate the two slowly enough.

Reading music is a great example. How many people have noticed that their intonation and technique suffer when they are reading music? It divides your attention, and the other aspects of music performance suffer if you don't work on consciously paying attention to each aspect of performance, and gradually integrate them into a seamless whole. And speaking of intonation: Wind players typically warm up playing long tones, and string players play scales in double stops, both in part to practice playing in tune outside of a musical context. They then have to integrate this in-tune playing, paying attention to it as they begin to pay attention to other musical aspects.

What we must do in these situations is to slow down and be conscious of all the musical elements we're trying to coordinate, consciously shifting our attention from one to the other, until doing so gets easier. Also, it helps to isolate different elements, only adding one element at a time, and to keep it slow until it's well integrated.

So now we get to the main point I want to make, the real secret of making decent technical progress in a limited amount of practice time. The secret is this: the speed of your technique will increase on its own, on its own time, if it's properly cultivated. I use the word "cultivate" deliberately, because you have to understand that the effects of practicing correctly will not be apparent in the current practice session, but will show up sometime in the near future. The rest period is part of the process. (20%–30% of the audience noticed this was true.)

So what is "proper cultivation?" In short: accurate, consistent repetition, while maintaining perfect technique. In long: see below!

When practicing to increase the speed of a given technique or piece of music, practice a short selection slowly, but not so slowly that it changes the entire character of the tune, simultaneously paying VERY close attention to:

1) maintaining perfect technique (defined below);
2) accuracy (defined below) ...all while striving for
3) consistency in performance (defined below).
Repeat the short selection, concentrating on all the factors above. Do not speed up, and, if necessary, use a metronome to keep your tempo down. It doesn't take enormous amounts of repetition (Perhaps 20 repetitions? Maybe two minutes of repetitions?) to cultivate the expected improvement if your concentration is good. In other words, we must be very careful to integrate all the factors above. (This is where we come back to efficiency—we are saving practice time by not spending too much time on any given problem on any given day.) Repeat every couple of days, and there should be noticeable progress in a few practice sessions. Trust that the improvement will come in the rest period between practice sessions, not on the day of the practice itself. The good news: your technique will speed up on its own, on its own time. The bad news: if you don't start early enough, you may not get your music learned in time. Thus, people are always tempted by shortcuts, which both slow the process down and lead to sloppy playing.

Many of the terms I use above need more explanation:

a short selection can be anywhere from a few notes to eight measures. Vary the length of the selection in your practice regime. Shorter (three notes–half a measure) is perhaps more efficient, because it allows more repetitions of the trouble spot per minute. It also allows you to closely compare subsequent repetitions of a difficult spot, without a lot of distractions in between, and get those repetitions as consistent as possible. But we must integrate this very short bit into the rest of the phrase, so if we spend, say, two-thirds of a short practice period on a short bit, we might spend the remaining third on longer segments that include the short segment, in order to integrate it into the rest of the phrase.

Perfect technique is usually what the best teachers say it is. (Generally, this involves having the body in as neutral a position as possible while still holding the instrument, and moving with a minimum amount of force. But that will vary for different instruments, and this is a general talk.) But if you practice this method for 2-3 months and don't see a significant improvement in speed, you're probably doing something wrong technically and should start experimenting with different technical approaches. Bad technique will limit speed all by itself, without regard to practice method. Also, you absolutely do not want too much tension. Tension slows you down.

Accuracy, in this context, is primarily rhythmic accuracy, but the music shouldn't be mechanical. "Accuracy" also includes good articulation and intonation; basically it means playing the music exactly the way you want to hear it. In other words: correct interpretation for the intended tempo. If you can't get it to sound good slow, it won't sound good when it speeds up. So it should be accurate in every detail—and your ear must be the arbiter.

Consistency in performance means integrating all of the above with as few imperfections as possible and a declining number of imperfections with each repetition. For a given series of repetitions, try to get the performance of each repetition exactly the same as the others. For subsequent series of repetitions, it's a good idea to vary the tempo or interpretation while continuing to strive for consistency within that series of repetitions. Practicing consistency in this way gives you control, not unmusicality. If the number of imperfections doesn't decline quickly as you repeat the passage, you are practicing the passage at too fast a tempo and need to slow it down.

One writer puts it this way: "NEVER DO IT WRONG." I get the point of this, but I think that trying to avoid making any mistakes psychs you out in an unproductive way. I say rather, "If the number of mistakes doesn't quickly decline as you repeat the passage, you are practicing the passage at too fast a tempo." A rule of thumb might be: don't miss more than two consecutive repetitions without either slowing down or stopping and figuring out what you're doing wrong.

[Question from the floor:] If you experience doing it right half a dozen times and then it all goes to h***, what do you do then? Stop?

DH: Slow it down.

It doesn't really help to pick a practice tempo and stick to it. What helps is to pick a practice tempo and do a bunch of repetitions, and then pick another tempo, and do a bunch more repetitions. Different tempos, either on different days or on the same day, depending on what you have time for. Ideally, for a passage that you have been working on a while, warm up slowly, then practice a series of repetitions at your fastest comfortable speed. Then put the metronome on, slow it down a little (maybe one click), and do another series of repetitions, then down another click and do another series of repetitions. Please notice that you slow down as you continue to add repetitions, not speed up. I don't know why this works, but it really smoothes things out, as well as giving you all the speed and accuracy you need.

Another thing that is very helpful to understand is that there is an optimal amount of time to spend on any given tune or technical problem per practice session. You learn something more thoroughly by coming back to it on many different days, so you want to give yourself plenty of lead time and divide your practice session into small segments, enabling you to touch on many different practice issues. This requires planning and organization but is totally worth it in results. You need sufficient time with each practice issue to become thoroughly familiarize with it, to warm up to it, and to develop sufficient repetition, so your segments can't be too short. I will usually spend a 5-10 minute practice segment on a 16-measure tune–more if it has lots of hard parts, or if I'm just beginning to work on it. The bulk of this time would be spent on repetitions of the hard parts, with perhaps only 20%–30% of the time spent on integrating the hard parts into their surrounding phrases.

If a hard part is actually two tricky bits very close together, work on the two bits separately, and then work on them together in the same practice segment. Then integrate them into the rest of the phrase. This is essentially a multitasking problem, and will require a slightly longer practice segment. (I'm assuming you're able to analyze exactly where a given technical problem is, so you can isolate it, work it out, and then practice it repetitively in a short phrase.)

Once a passage is learned and brought up to speed, it's helpful to continue repetitions for a little while longer (and usually at a click or two slower than performance speed), because the consistency you develop will then last longer and carry over better into performance. Try to resist the temptation to always practice something faster once it has come up to speed. The rule of thumb is, if you find a practice method that works in efficiently bringing music up to speed, don't abandon that method as soon as the passage is up to speed—continue doing more of what works. The truth is that even a well-learned technique or tune is apt to drift over time, and we need to keep coming back to it to keep it perfected. We will not need as much time to re-perfect it on each occasion we come back to it as we did to learn it initially, and the amount of time it takes when we come back to re-perfect it will gradually diminish.

For example, it might take ten five-minute-per-day practice segments to thoroughly master a given tune. If you practice every other day, this process would be spread over 20 days. If you then let the tune "rest" for a couple of months, you would come back to it and find that you seemingly had to start all over again. But if you repeat relearning the tune slowly in similar, five-minute practice segments, you'll find it only takes 6–8 such segments to re-perfect the tune. Let it rest another couple months, re-perfect it yet again, and this time it will only take 4–5 segments. If you continue to take a few months off, and then come back to the tune and re-perfect it, eventually it will only take a short warm-up (on a good day, not even that) to have the tune ready for performance on a permanent basis. Obviously, the numbers of practice segments given above are estimates, but they are based on written records I have kept of my practice segments for various tunes, so the overall pattern is fairly accurate and predictable.

The key point here is that you can't assume that once something is learned, it will stay learned. Over time, you'll have to go back and re-perfect pieces. But stick with it, and eventually the music will stay learned, with only minor maintenance. I recommend the foregoing procedure to any performing musician as a way to build a permanent, core repertoire that is always ready for performance. Obviously, nobody has enough practice time to work on every piece with such rigor, so you need to choose a small body of repertoire that you want always to have ready.

[Question from the floor:] Will you explain to me why the rest period is so useful?

DH: I don't know, but I think it's muscle development.

Dr. Elmar Schmeisser: No, it's RNA synthesis in the brain. And that takes time. (I'm a neurophysiologist.) To lay down memory, you have to impress a pattern into the hippocampus, which is a structure in the brain. In order to transfer that pattern from short-term memory (which contains something you remember for five minutes and then forget) into long-term memory, you have to synthesize RNA. You have to synthesize molecules, which takes time. You make these molecules generally when you sleep, and that's why you have to sleep on something to remember it. You've got to synthesize RNA to lay this stuff down. You cannot hurry it. Another process also takes time: for you to learn a pattern, you actually have to change the synaptic pattern that you have on your neurons. The neurons in the brain, which actually are doing the co-ordination, which set down the motor commands—to get these to fire in a particular sequence and strength, you need x number of synapses doing that. It takes a while to recruit and grow those. You actually have to build new connections. And that takes protein synthesis and hours, if not days.

DH: So you're talking about cultivation here?

Dr. Schmeisser: It is literally growing brain, or growing little pieces of brain.

DH: Thank you for your comments. That reminds me of another point about attitude: I think it helps with practicing to understand (or even visualize), that skill is not in your fingers, it's in your brain. I sometimes hear pipers say that another piper "has great fingers." I want to tell them (though I never have) that their fingers are no different than the piper they admire so much, and that their fingers might be just as great, or greater, if they would focus on solving the appropriate problem.

OTHER PRACTICE TIPS

Metronome use: You'll find that a metronome is crucial through this process. Some of the best musicians I know practice regularly with a metronome. Its most important use is this: When a passage (or technique) speeds up in the rest period, it usually doesn't speed up in accurate metrical proportions. In other words, the relationship between, say, quarter notes and eighth notes will not necessarily be correct at the faster tempo. Practice with the metronome will restore that relationship to its correct proportions. I call this process "re-calibration." This proportional drifting happens not only in the rest periods between practice sessions but also when a previously learned piece is put aside for a period of months. In both cases, the solution is the same: practice with a metronome to recalibrate the proportions between rhythmic values. ("De-calibration" is in fact one of the principal rhythmic problems musicians have; faster note values are typically rushed in relation to slower ones.)

A metronome is also useful for measuring your progress in bringing a passage up to speed and for controlling your tempo to ensure that you're practicing a passage at a variety of tempos. This is important: NEVER use a metronome to force yourself to speed a piece of music up. It just develops bad habits that make the music sound bad. It's actually best to do a series of repetitions first without a metronome, and only then to turn the metronome on and find the first click slower than the tempo at which you've just been practicing. The reason for this is the multitasking problem mentioned above: to add a metronome is to add one more element to what you're trying to do, and coordinate, and be aware of, so it must be integrated slowly and carefully. Speeding up and listening to a metronome is changing two things at once, and you'll learn faster if you only change one thing at a time. Possibly the most important reason for using a metronome is that teaches you to keep a beat in relation to an outside beat. This allows you to play in ensemble. If you can't play with a metronome (and play musically with a metronome), you can't play with other musicians.

Dotting both ways: One limitation to practicing difficult passages slowly is that fast movements feel different than slow ones, so it's sometimes hard to get slow practice to translate into fast playing. One really effective way around this is to "dot the passage both ways." For example, change the rhythm of a difficult passage of straight 8th-notes to a series of dotted 8th +16th notes, and get that rhythm as accurate as possible (as well as paying attention to articulation, technique, execution, and everything else). Then play the same passage with the dotting reversed, to a 16th note + dotted 8th pattern, and again practice to get that rhythm as accurate as possible (etc.). It seems best to spend an equivalent amount of time on each rhythm, and to work on both rhythms in the same practice session. This technique makes bringing passages up to speed much quicker. It also gives you more rhythmic control in general. But it seems to work much better on material that is relatively new, and seems less effective for re-polishing "old" music.

Bad days: It's really helpful to have a solid plan for handling a bad practice day. Sometimes when you're tired, or can't concentrate, or your fingers are just klutzy, you can be tempted to skip your practice session. While this is always an option, a skillful attitude adjustment can help you make the most of a bad practice day. You notice on a bad day that everything is harder, slower, and just not as good. When I have a day like this, I find that just to accept this fact and consciously be very patient with myself allows me to continue productive practice. I slow things down even further than before, simplify the practice issues to a point where I can deal with them, and continue to do accurate, consistent repetition with perfect technique at whatever tempo I can manage. I usually find that the next time I come back to my instrument, the passages I worked on are better than they had ever been! So it can be very helpful to persevere on a bad day. I also find, although this may be due to years of practice, that patient concentration by itself usually improves my mental state enough to make a noticeable improvement in my playing. As stated above, both concentration and attitude are key components of successful practice, and both tend themselves to improve with practice. In this respect, bad days are a valuable laboratory!

Long-term planning: If you are working on a particularly difficult passage or technique, it seems best to take a break from it every so often, perhaps for a few weeks. In other words, when you practice the same thing for months on end, you definitely see diminishing returns from your practice time. You have to be methodical without being too obsessive. Mix it up, and vary your practice routine enough to prevent getting into a rut.

I find it helpful to think of my practice time in terms of some larger time period, like a "season" or a "semester." This helps me quantify what I'm accomplishing in the practice room, and aids in repertoire planning. It also serves as a reminder that practicing is not a life sentence but a series of finite tasks, each of which builds on the others.

Have you heard this one? "Practice does not make perfect, practice makes permanent." Basically, we are creatures of habit—we must simply make it a habit to get it right.

Suggested books for further reading:

Bruser, Madeline. The Art of Practicing: A Guide to Making Music from the Heart. New York: Bell Tower, 1997.

MacGillivray, James. Rhythmic Fingerwork: Instruction in Technique for the Highland Bagpipe. Aurora, Ontario: self-published, 1998.

And on the web:

Kageyama, Noa. The Bulletproof Musician Blog. http://www.bulletproofmusician.com/

Schuring, Martin. Thoughts on Practicing. ©1999 Martin Schuring. http://www.public.asu.edu/~schuring/Oboe/practice.html

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