What would be a good way to remember 2000 pages of a heavy biology textbook until the end of the year?

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#1 2 October, 2016 - 04:06
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What would be a good way to remember 2000 pages of a heavy biology textbook until the end of the year?


Good day, everybody,
Since the beginning of September I had a plan to memorize around 2000 pages of a very detailed biology textbook with a lot of new words and concepts. However, for past four weeks I have noticed that I am making very little progress. Since there are very many things to remember, it sometimes takes around thirty minutes to memorize two pages and that's not the pace that I am willing to go with.
Currently I am writing notes to Anki while reading and after I finish a section of a chapter, I try to memorize everything that I had written in the flash cards. I had noticed that it is a lot harder to think of proper mnemonics for biological concepts, compared to language studies. While I would have very little problems memorizing one hundred German words in an hour, it takes me a lot of time to really memorize concepts. I tried remembering the first letters of key words and making some funny images out of them, then recreating the concept word by word, but sometimes it is quite hard to do something like that (for example, if there are multiple of the same letters or if the same letter combination had already been memorized for a different thing).
Another problem that I encountered is that I have to remember very many lists of things. List of compounds of viruses' reproduction cycles, organs' systems and such. They take ages for me.
I am hesitant to use memory journeys, since some lists are only five items long. Wouldn't it be irrational to think of a place or route just to remember such a small thing?
I also had some problems with numbers, but I think the best solution would be to develop a list of 100 mnemonics for each number 0 - 99 and use that.

Also, I would be glad to hear your opinions about how feasible it is to finish that many pages with tight schedule (I can spend only around 1-2 hours a day, a little more on weekends).

TL;DR
Goal: memorize 2000 pages of scientific text;
Deadline: The end of 2016 year;
Available time: ~1 hour a day;
Currently facing problems: hard to memorize lists, complex concepts, even if I understand them;

3 October, 2016 - 14:07
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Have you seen the pages about how to memorize a textbook and how to memorize a book? There are links to more discussions about it on those pages. There is also an FAQ on how do I memorize a book?

If it's difficult to keep up with your memorization schedule, maybe try reducing the amount of information that you memorize from each page. About 200 hours (?) to memorize 2,000 pages of facts seems very ambitious. You would need to memorize 10 pages per hour, not including reviewing the facts.

2 January, 2017 - 17:14
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I memorised 1500 pages for an exam. I used notes that resumed my work, and and used synesthesia with the Locci method.

I walked mentally in my memory palace, foolowing the chapters and debate with the notions and diagrams.. when in doubt, i pushed a lille further. I get bacdk to the core lessons only when i was sure i didn't remember correctly.

5 January, 2017 - 00:17
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Quote:

and used synesthesia with the Locci method.

That sounds interesting. Could you explain how that technique works for you?

5 January, 2017 - 04:41
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Let's say to memorise 10 words. The simplest way do do that, without Locci, is to use a story to link them. To put emphasis on the very items you want to mémorise (and not of the other elements of the story), you use sysnesthesia.

The words are not just words or visual items. They got a 3Dshape, an odor, they make noise, music , they got odd détails, they crack jokes etc.

So, in the story, the items are 'scintillating'. You can easily pick them, remenber them etc.

Then, when we become good at it (when the neuroplasticity of the brain had created or reactivated the synaptic zones dedicated to it) you can beguin to link two synesthesic images to remember more abstract things.

Ex: The capital of France is Paris

I imagine an old fashioned Franck warrior who perish defending the Eifel tower, with a luxuary of akward détails.

Those techniques does not only helps you to remember. They boost the way you use your brain to remember, and they gives you Tools to improve the way you use Locci or other methods.

5 January, 2017 - 13:56
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So you mean a kind of artificial synesthesia? I was curious if you were using natural synesthetic associations (like numbers that have colors). I've heard of a couple of memorizers who use assistance from natural synesthesia when memorizing. It is a very interesting topic.

5 January, 2017 - 14:20
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Training to have an 'artificial synesthesia ' (not so artificial when you have the habbit to develop it) is one of the precious gift training can gives you.

14 April, 2017 - 21:43
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Fascinating. When I took chemistry in college I'd record my written notes, and play back the recordings while reading the notes. I would also listen to the recordings while driving (and ironically see the pages in ny head). It wasn't the fastest system (to be sure) but it worked brilliantly.

This was a large class (with over 100 students) and I finished with the highest marks. This system was critical to earning the Suma Cum Laude award for undergraduate gpa, but it isn't a super fast system. It takes advantage of the different ways we learn, and by approaching the information from multiple angles I was able to fully absorb the material.

I'm quite interested in learning a faster system... the one catch that I noticed from the chem course (and it may have just been me) was the transition period. There was a clear transition period between simply memorizing a concept, terms, etc... and having those things become fully integrated into my memory - once I had something down, it was locked.

I was sick the last two week of class and during finals week. The last thing we covered was nuclear chemistry, which was my favorite part of the course, but I was too sick to study. It was my lowest grade of the entire course; however, even though I couldn't study for the final, but I didn't need to; everything I had learned over the semester with this system was still locked in.

I would recommend utilizing different techniques to find what works best for you. The audio review greatly shortened my study time because it engaged different ways of learning...

I have a hardcore engineering book to master myself, and need to get started. Some of the above systems sound far more efficient, and will be fun to test out.
But until a system proves that it works for you, I'd recommend always having a backup.

15 April, 2017 - 03:26
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I haven't done much memorizing in the wild so I can't help you with the core of your problem, but it seems to me that with the problem of several small lists you could combine them into one palace or journey. Even if they aren't conceptually related, you could just jump to the location in memory whenever you need a specific list. One way to relate the lists is chronologically, e.g. this palace is for memorizing all the lists I need to learn in the next week or two. I hope this helps.

14 May, 2017 - 05:06
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can anyone here explain how to learn synesthesia.

15 May, 2017 - 18:26
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Quote:

can anyone here explain how to learn synesthesia.

Check out this thread: Synesthesia Training

25 May, 2017 - 06:44
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Joined: 5 months 4 weeks ago

Quote:

can anyone here explain how to learn synesthesia.

My answer to this question, answering the method of another person on the same subject

Quote:

"Personally, I've tried to reach synesthesia via self-hypnosis"

(the my answer to his proposal)

It's a big gun. You can train yourself to achieve 'artificial synesthesia' with some easier exercices.

1. Train to memorise grocery list with little stories, with each item as a protagonist.
(ex: milk is going to the book store, he stumble on a carrot, so they beguin to fight. They put pastic gloves as boxing gloves etc)
Note: add colors, noises, odors etc. The more 'vivid' the story is, the easier it gets to rember it

2. You can train on more abstract or complex links (like countries names and capitols) with images and little stories (The capital of France is Paris, so i image a Frank warrior who Perish in the stupidest way possible, with a great deal of vivid détails)
It's easier to remember images and stories than names, for most people.

3. Then, when your ability to transform anything in 3d stories is up to date (a few weeks) try to apply it to what you have to do (anderstanding a text, memorizing with the Loci method, etc)

Use loci to remember the 'structure', and 'scynestethic scenes' to remember the content of the structure.

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