Three-Dimensional Chess

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#1 14 July, 2013 - 19:26
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Three-Dimensional Chess


I stumbled across a Wikipedia page about three-dimensional chess. Check out the Raumschach 3D board.

It looks very interesting. Has any one played it? Do you think a 3D spatial game like that would help with mental visualization?

14 July, 2013 - 20:32
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Actually, a few months ago I made an extremely unpolished game of 3-D chess in GameMaker, a piece of software used to program games. It follows slightly different rules than the one in the Wikipedia article as it is an 8x8x8 board and some piece movements might be different, but it works nonetheless. In the game I programmed, graphics are 2d and there are just 8 chessboards placed side-by side, so the player has to imagine the three dimensions themselves, but the pieces move as if the boards were stacked on top of each other and were actually in three dimensions. The game is only two-player (an AI for this would be insanely difficult to make), castling and en-passant are not supported, the game does not tell you if you are in check/checkmate (Though it tells you who wins if your king is captured), it only runs on windows, and it has graphics that are just pathetic, but if its something your interested in I could share it to you via google drive. At the very least it shows you all of your possible moves for each piece.

I have played the game only a few times with some friends, but I must say that it is extremely difficult to plan ahead and actually strategize. 3d graphics might make this a tad easier, but either way its much harder than normal chess. Also, pieces have different relative values. For example, bishops are much more powerful than rooks in 3d chess, because rooks can only move in straight lines, but bishops can move on a diagonal between any two dimensions, or all three. This might not make sense until you play the game and see what I mean, but bishops normally have many more possible moves than rooks do and are much more deceptive. Pawns take a while to promote because they have to get to the last rank and the last level/board, but are very powerful in endgames. Unless you can really think ahead a lot in this game, you will probably need at least 4ish queens to checkmate (as the king always has 26 possible moves), so pawn promotion is useful in the end.

As for if playing 3-D chess would help mental visualization, I doubt it, but who knows, for some people it might. It certainly gets your brain thinking at least.

Anyways, let me know if you want me to share it to you via google drive!

15 July, 2013 - 17:15
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Sounds very interesting. :)
Does it work on Linux? Does Game Maker support 3D graphics?

15 July, 2013 - 17:24
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Sorry, it does not work on Linux. Game Maker does theoretically support some 3d graphics, but I am no expert and have never used them, and I have hear they are somewhat limited in use. Because its graphics/layout is two dimensional, it makes very little sense at first glance. Admittedly, the game looks horrible, and you really have to use your brain to see how the game is really being played in three dimensions. Still, the pieces can move using three-dimensional rules, so at least the gameplay is three dimensional.

15 July, 2013 - 18:38
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I wonder if it would be possible to make a text-based version. It could look a bit more slick than this, but a similar concept.

I'm not sure if this would work -- just brainstorming:

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It wouldn't look great as text, so the only advantage would be that it could be visualized three-dimensionally.

15 July, 2013 - 18:43
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I guess one other major problem with a text version is that it's too large to fit on my computer screen. :)

(I can't run the Windows version unfortunately.)

15 July, 2013 - 19:55
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I am sure that would be possible, and be easier to visualize than what I have created. Unfortunately because of the way I programmed it (I actually have it check for moves by checking for collisions at certain points in the room based on the fact that each board/level is 116 pixels apart and each square on each board is 10 pixels apart) it is very difficult for me to make adjustments as far as how the boards are laid out without fixing a large amount of my code. I should have thought about this more before I started programming it, and I should have probably just used matrixes to store information about the boards, but I did not, so I am probably not going to fix it at this point.

18 July, 2015 - 02:38
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Joined: 1 year 12 months ago

No I don't think it does, In chess, playing blind chess is much more probable when it comes to mental visualization, and it also helps you remember chess notations, openings and strategies easier, the problem here is time, though, when it comes to tournaments people often lose because of time, well In that case practice blitz chess, start from 30 seconds to 5 seconds. :)

Oh, one more thing, don't use memorization when it comes to chess, don't be a robot, or you'll be a food for Bobby Fischer :)

18 July, 2015 - 03:01
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Joined: 1 year 12 months ago

Can I take a look at it, I'm also a programmer and a chess player(Not those amateurs in street), Why don't you use PGN files for AI's, you only need to create a notation on the board according to a pgn, and you can easily create an AI.

Don't you think, instead of making a game on GM it's more likeable to create one on HTML5 or Flash, Flash is a lot easier to manipulate and the event handlers are more unprivileged also GM uses drag n' drop event handlers, I would even use Stencyl drag n' drop since GM is very limited.

Also, If you use HTML5 and create a chess game It's only a matter of time to finish it, you can just use for() loops also It's more adjustable through css3 and If you like the game to be executable you can compile it with ap.js.
Btw,
I'm currently developing a basketball management game, I've been finished with the prototyping and started to create the main game, but I had lots of problems. Oh, yeah.. If you need help in coding just tell me or I can also make an AI.

18 July, 2015 - 03:17
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Joined: 1 year 12 months ago

It will be around like this...
Firefox has a 3D feature it can turn elements to 3D, you can use it to make 3-Dimensional Chess.

var block = document.getElementById('element').innerHTML;
function createBoard() {
for(x=1;x<=5;x++) {
block += "( ) "
//I'm not sure about the spaces but i think It's like this block += " "
for(x=1;x<=5;x++) {
createBoard();
}
}
}

output(With block+= " "):
---( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
---- ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
-------( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
--------( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
----------( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

Treat the ---- as spaces,

10 August, 2015 - 23:45
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Joined: 2 years 3 months ago

Quote:

Firefox has a 3D feature it can turn elements to 3D

Do you mean the button in the Web console, or is there a JavaScript API for that too?

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