Photographic memory

10 posts / 0 new
Last post
#1 27 December, 2015 - 17:09
Offline
Joined: 1 year 3 months ago

Photographic memory


Hello,

I am a new member here and for the past 16 months I have even looking for techniques, methods, or systems that would significantly enhance memory within a short period of time. I have tried methods such as mnemonics, Zox Pro, Hypnosis, Transcranial magnetic simulation, subliminal messages, mind mapping, association, visualization and meditation with limited if any success. I am looking for a revolutionary new technique in memory enhancement. An instant photographic memory of you will. Maybe I am being niece but please tell me if you have anythingalong those lines.

Thank you.

P.S Photographic memory can difined as being able to see a page of text and be able to recite or reproduce it from memory.

28 December, 2015 - 14:38
Offline
Joined: 3 years 11 months ago

Doesn't exist. You won't find it.

Do the hard work of learning reliable techniques instead.

28 December, 2015 - 19:29
28 December, 2015 - 20:24
Offline
Joined: 1 year 5 months ago

I have done a bit of reading into photographic memory. Unfortunately, based on current scientific evidence, it either doesn't exist or exist only in a selected few. I can be pretty sure to say that it cannot be trained, one is either born with or without. Memory palace is the best memory technique that can give you anything close to photographic memory. But you will have to put in the hard work and time. But it is definitely rewarding.

30 December, 2015 - 15:48
Offline
Joined: 1 year 10 months ago

I am with Graham on this, a photographical memory (remembering every single detail without using techniques and without it being changable) doesn't exist for as far as known. Every memory researched so far still has to attach all information to something else, it can't just store raw data. That is also what we know about how memory works, every bit of raw data HAS to be converted into a format in which our brain can store it. This also means that through techniques of suggestion, a memory can be altered, which shouldn't be the case with an eidetic memory.

I can also say that there are no shortcuts to getting a better memory, you work on getting a better memory or you won't improve a lot. Or you must want to believe in smart drugs.

Also on a sidenote, the techniques we use are not new. They have maybe been modernized, but they have been around for hundreds/thousands of years.

18 January, 2016 - 08:47
Offline
Joined: 4 years 1 month ago

interesting points. However, if we go with the absolute assumption that every memory must be associated with a previous memory, does that mean that when we are born we are born with some memories to associate things with or do we create a first memory to which all other subsequent memories are linked to??

hmmmm!

Also, a photographic memory as described by the original poster would be a great thing to develop/learn. I'm pretty sure it is beyond our current ability, but, who knows, maybe there is a technique out there that makes it easy. THink back to when you first learned a memory system, wasn't it absolutely amazing how much information you could correctly retain. a string of 100 numbers for example. Prior to memory systems I would have not believed that possible.

So we should seek the impossible and push ourselves to develop new memory systems and new approaches.

Any one have any out there ideas we could try?

When I was developing a speed binary method I tried the idea of almost burning the image onto my retina so that when I closed my eyes I could read the 1s and 0s and use another method to get it stored for longer.

Just some thoughts

18 January, 2016 - 08:55
Offline
Joined: 4 years 1 month ago

If photographic memory was real and accessible to the average human (I think I'm one of those), what would the hypothetical process be?

Here is a hypothetical process, just for the fun of it.
Maybe preparing yourself for a moment with your eyes closed, placing the page in front of you at a particular distance. Smelling the page first (as an anchor for the memory) before opening your left eye and then your right eye for approximately 5 seconds each, then both for another 5 seconds. Close your eyes and boom, the page is in your memory.

That would be cool.

P.s. it doesn't work, save yourself the embarrassment :-)

22 February, 2016 - 04:55
Offline
Joined: 5 years 1 day ago

How long do you want to remember the information? How long do you want to train to gain the ability? There are a couple of techniques that work for limited periods of time. With one You will remember an image of a page for 30 to 40 minutes. It is mainly used for putting on stage shows. It takes 6 months to develop and it involves dietary restrictions.
With the other you will be able to hold anywhere from a written paragraph to a page in your head for a minute or two.

I don't think either is worth the cost.

When you tried hypnosis did you use age regression and/or time distortion. If you had eidetic memory as a child and you are a good hypnotic subject you can be regressed to that age and regain the ability while regressed. I've never seen anyone retain it after coming out of the trance. I saw a demo done at a graduate hypnosis seminar I took.

With time distortion you can reduce study/ learning time.

Memory palaces are the best way to go.

If you used subliminal messages the best are the ones by Bud Lowery. Whole Brain Learning is the only place you can get the now that he is dead. They will improve your memory, but nowhere near photographic memory and you may develop a tolerance from them. I took a seminar on accelerated learning and we compared the various subliminal techniques. This was 20 years ago there may have been improvements.

22 February, 2016 - 16:18
Offline
Joined: 1 year 3 months ago

Quote:

interesting points. However, if we go with the absolute assumption that every memory must be associated with a previous memory, does that mean that when we are born we are born with some memories to associate things with or do we create a first memory to which all other subsequent memories are linked to

Your comment make me think about epigenetics. Epigenetics is the field that study changes in your genetic activity without modification of your DNA, this changes can be things like environment or even events that happened to your grandparents!!!

An example: how a cell knows what kind of cell (muscular, brain, stomach) needs to be??

23 February, 2016 - 05:17
Offline
Joined: 1 year 10 months ago

Quote:

interesting points. However, if we go with the absolute assumption that every memory must be associated with a previous memory, does that mean that when we are born we are born with some memories to associate things with or do we create a first memory to which all other subsequent memories are linked to??

A question that is still being asked to this day, with various theories. We barely know how the adult brain works, our knowledge of the infantile brain is even less.

It could be that this isn't limited to cognitive memories, and that the first memories are formed as a connection to other parts of the brain. Giving you motoric memories for example, you do something and that has a result. Modern techniques for learning to use a language actually come back to something similiar. You don't learn that the japanese word for car is kuruma, for example. You learn that kuruma is the object, the car, there is a direct connection between the object and "kuruma", and "car" is not inbetween them.

It could be the pure plasticity of the infantile brain. The brain of a kid is incredibly unspecified. A kid can lose half his brain, to just have the other half take over. It can be that the first memories for our memory network are formed in that phase, unconnected memories.

Also, I am not sure what "drilled" memories are like. Like when I had to learn map of countries of the world for school. It was just drilling and repetition. I forgot almost all about a month later. I don't know how those memories work, but then again, science only know the basics of the brain. We know a bit about how it works, but that's all. We know about neurons, various regions of the brain, various things. But how it all works, or why it all works... that is an enormous mystery. As SiriB mentioned, epigenetics is one of the parts of science that might give a few more answers one day.

Learn memory techniques for free! Just click the "Sign up" button below to create an account and we'll send you an email with some tips on how to get started.

Related content: