Memorize multiple lists of 100+ items with positions

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#1 6 June, 2016 - 13:49
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Memorize multiple lists of 100+ items with positions


Greetings respected memory artist,

Can you help me with my first memory challenge?

After reading all about loci, pegs and links I feel motivated and want to start my first project. But I'm still not entirely sure how I should approach this...

I'd like to memorize a few lists each containing a little over a hundred items (mix of names, objects and ideas). And I need to memorize them in order. But I also need to be able to recall an item by the item number. So I need to be able to mention the entire lists from front to end. But if someone asks me the item of number so and so, I should also be able to recall that.

I've read a bit about the major system and the method of Lanier. And I think I've read too much to figure out how to approach this. And I also don't have the experience to know what works for me and what doesn't. But I do know I'd prefer a system with which I can recall all items instantly when hearing the number but also sum up the entire list really fast.

Any suggestion is more than welcome. I'm looking forward to learn from your knowledge and expertise. Thank you in advance!

Sincerely,

Hashim

6 June, 2016 - 16:45
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Joined: 1 year 8 months ago

Well, either the Method of Loci or the Peg system will work for this. I'm partial to the Method of Loci, but really, either will do if this is the only project you have in mind. With either, you'll need to do the preparation. For the Method of Loci, you'll need to least 50 loci (if you plan to put two words on each locus, like I do), or 100 loci (if you want just one word per locus). 100 loci might be best if you're new to all this, plus it'll make recalling the n-th item easier. You'll want to mentally highlight every fifth locus so that can quickly go to any given locus on command. For example, if someone asks you what is #67, you would go to your 65th locus and count up two to find the word.

For the Peg system, you'll have to devise your 100 pegs and remember them. I think this takes longer, but if you can come up with some memorable ways to establish all 100 pegs, it will probably be a tad faster for going directly to an n-th item.

7 June, 2016 - 06:08
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Joined: 9 months 3 weeks ago

Hi Tracym,

Thank you for your suggestions!

To me the Method of Loci/Memory Palace seems easier to remember. But as you've mentions, the peg system offers instant recall because.

Because of the instant recall I tend to favor the peg system for this project. I just have one concern...

How do I memorize multiple lists with the peg system?

I'm afraid that while I'm trying to memorize four separate lists, all of them containing over a hundred items, and all of them in need of instant recall for the rest of my life, I will confuse the items in the list because the same pegs are used for all the lists. Is there a solution to that?

Looking forward to all suggestions!

Sincerely,

Hashim

7 June, 2016 - 13:38
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Joined: 1 year 8 months ago

Quote:

How do I memorize multiple lists with the peg system?

Now, I can't help you here, as I don't really know how. This might be another reason the Method of Loci is more popular, as you can just create different, distinct, palaces, and store your lists without confusion.

7 June, 2016 - 07:18
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Joined: 9 months 3 weeks ago

Thank you for your help, Tracym!

Do you know of someone in these forums who is known for finding solutions for such situations? All suggestions are appreciated.

Thank you!

Hashim

9 June, 2016 - 13:05
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Joined: 1 year 8 months ago

Unless someone can come up with a better idea, you may just have to experiment yourself, if you're committed to the idea of using pegs for storing different types of lists. It may not be a problem if your lists are sufficiently different. I can certainly imagine memorizing, say, the top 100 selling fruits in the word, and then also memorizing the top 100 most fatal diseases using the same pegs, and having no problem with interference.

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