Great Tips on Creating a Large Number of Points with the Method of Loci

23 posts / 0 new
Last post
#1 17 April, 2011 - 11:52
Offline
Joined: 2 years 3 months ago

Great Tips on Creating a Large Number of Points with the Method of Loci


Ron White has some great tips on creating very large journeys (1000 to 3000 loci). Check it out here:
http://www.brainathlete.com/method-loci-memory-journey-construction/

Basically, walk around town photographing everything. Put the photos in a presentation software file (e.g., PowerPoint or OpenOffice) to memorize them.

I did something like that in London last summer, but only did two journeys of 70 and 20 loci, and put the images in a word processor document, not slides. I should have been thinking on a larger scale.

18 April, 2011 - 19:57
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

Last week I was playing with the idea of going for a walk and video taping the journey.
For more obscure trip the video might help mold the journey into your memory.

19 April, 2011 - 12:52
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

The 3000 pictures wouldn't take advantage of the built-in sequential memory that comes from using a well-known route or building, right? Is this just a matter of running out of places one knows well?

Or do you think we're supposed to understand him as photographing everything in sequence along some route through town?

19 April, 2011 - 17:23
Offline
Joined: 2 years 3 months ago

I think he did them in sequence. Going through the PowerPoint slides is a way to become familiar with the order...

21 April, 2011 - 04:45
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

much easier (didnt try it yet, but it is in my plans):

use the StreetView in GoogleMaps, provided it is present for the journey you intend to memorize.
It has the added advantage that you can at each step look left&right to memorize every locus better...

alessandro

9 May, 2011 - 20:14
rtr
rtr's picture
Offline
Joined: 6 years 1 month ago

alexxx wrote:

much easier (didnt try it yet, but it is in my plans):

use the StreetView in GoogleMaps, provided it is present for the journey you intend to memorize.
It has the added advantage that you can at each step look left&right to memorize every locus better...

alessandro

Yes, this. If you need massive amounts of loci I think you have to use compound loci, like the flower shop is just a link to 10 loci inside. Or even deeper with a 3 or 4 level compound loci. That would mean the flower shop holds 100 or 1000 loci.

11 May, 2011 - 02:42
Offline
Joined: 6 years 1 month ago

alexxx wrote:

much easier (didnt try it yet, but it is in my plans):

use the StreetView in GoogleMaps, provided it is present for the journey you intend to memorize.
It has the added advantage that you can at each step look left&right to memorize every locus better...

alessandro

Great idea man!

12 May, 2011 - 06:30
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

I like the idea, but I keep thinking it's somehow going to cause something to be lost.

The initial premise of these systems of loci was that it got you out and about the town. Each trip led to more revelations and more loci. You saw new things which expanded your knowledge.

The photo idea sounds good, but I just think that a lot of people are falling in love with the same sort of mindset that existed about 50 years ago for education. Colleges offered "accelerated" coursework in college. Not harder work, just more smushed together. So you could go through "four" years of college in 2.5. Some things must remain "slow cooked." College is one of them. So are memory techniques. I think something ineffable is lost by the use of haste.

12 May, 2011 - 06:30
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

I like the idea, but I keep thinking it's somehow going to cause something to be lost.

The initial premise of these systems of loci was that it got you out and about the town. Each trip led to more revelations and more loci. You saw new things which expanded your knowledge.

The photo idea sounds good, but I just think that a lot of people are falling in love with the same sort of mindset that existed about 50 years ago for education. Colleges offered "accelerated" coursework in college. Not harder work, just more smushed together. So you could go through "four" years of college in 2.5. Some things must remain "slow cooked." College is one of them. So are memory techniques. I think something ineffable is lost by the use of haste.

12 May, 2011 - 07:13
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

@Alex: I absolutely agree. My suggestion about using StreetView was born out of fear of remaining without ideas for loci sequences.
I totally believe that nothing can surpass "being there", with the added memory hints of sounds, smells, and so on.

18 May, 2011 - 04:47
Offline
Joined: 6 years 1 month ago

If we want to remember something it usually helps by associating the thing with something we already know.

We already have billions of loci so it's a matter of choice and finding which ones create the least interference.

How about this for an idea?

Become the director of a film you know well and place everything you want to remember inside the film. You can change all the appearances and what people say but keep the chronology of it. So you remember structure: You will then have 2 films, yours and the real one.

so instead of, replaced with random examples, making them funny:

Terminator: arnie, "I'll be back........(insert image) "i'll be a fat sumo eating chicken and chips"
James Bond: "the name's Bond, James ....(insert image)"the name's Bond, James... oh my goodness look at that 8 foot girraffe smoking a joint and singing happy birthday"

Endless fun, endless loci :-)

24 May, 2011 - 11:55
Offline
Joined: 6 years 1 month ago

I find the Google topic interesting. I know, from a personal standpoint, I remember places better when I've actually been there. I don't know how well I'd remember an online journey, though I'm open minded.

I have a question about numbers. I committed numbers 1-30 before actually having a system. I used rhyming to associate the number with the image. Then I switched to the Dominic method and started with numerical/letter associations. Do you think it matters? Should I go back and relearn everything in one system?

Does anyone have a slideshow 00-99 in the Dominic system with pictures?

Thanks, Todd

26 May, 2011 - 12:37
Offline
Joined: 2 years 3 months ago

I don't think it really matters if numbers 1 to 30 aren't done with Dominic System. Dominic himself even recommends using the first image that comes to mind for numbers (like Dudley Moore for "10") and then using his system to fill in the blanks.

I don't know of any slideshows, but there are some links to Dominic System lists here:
http://www.ludism.org/mentat/DominicSystem

29 May, 2011 - 07:47
Offline
Joined: 6 years 3 months ago

I like the idea of using a movie as a source of loci. I keep thinking of Steve Martin's "The Jerk" which i have watched endless times in English and Spanish. I recall the scene sequence exactly, so it is a build in journey for me. My wife has watched "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" a few thousand times over the years. I pointed out how she could use it. She listened tolerantly and was even a little excited. Thanks for the ideas, guys!

29 May, 2011 - 10:40
Offline
Joined: 6 years 1 month ago

I like these ideas for building journeys. Pictures and movies are good for a non-visualizer like myself.

One way i construct a journey through walking is to use a peg list to put the loci into as I walk and then when I'm home i go through the pegs and write down the loci. Then I run playing card memorization against the new journey to practice it and free up the peg list.

For instance, I walked down my street noticed a unique yard and imagined a tea party in it, then a house with an RV and imagined Noah loading the animals onto it. Then a fenced house with a big calendar on it.

I like to mix and match, learning journeys with peg lists, lists with journeys and using the cards to practice them both.

15 July, 2011 - 04:49
Offline
Joined: 5 years 11 months ago

Josh wrote:

I think he did them in sequence. Going through the PowerPoint slides is a way to become familiar with the order...

I'm a bit skeptic that this would be efficient. Taking the journey is what actually keeps the loci in sequence, whereas inspecting the photographs helps familiarize yourself with the loci. Obviously there's no time for learning the journey by heart nor spending enough time at each location to create lively imagery of it in your mind, so I suspect for larger journeys one simply has to have a good memory undepending on techniques.

19 July, 2011 - 17:51
Offline
Joined: 6 years 3 weeks ago

rtr wrote:
alexxx wrote:

much easier (didnt try it yet, but it is in my plans):

use the StreetView in GoogleMaps, provided it is present for the journey you intend to memorize.
It has the added advantage that you can at each step look left&right to memorize every locus better...

alessandro

Yes, this. If you need massive amounts of loci I think you have to use compound loci, like the flower shop is just a link to 10 loci inside. Or even deeper with a 3 or 4 level compound loci. That would mean the flower shop holds 100 or 1000 loci.

Definitely agree with Alexxx, But question @rtr how would you focus those internal 1000 Loci? I brutalized myself trying to put 30 some PAOs in one of my shelves at home, I thought I could regularize the system by imagining one in the foreground, one at the back, one in each corner of every pigeon hole of the shelf -- I didn't do so well and I felt like I was memorizing by rout.

I switched it to a section of a route I used to walk all the time -- I think if I had street view of that street in Japan I could have condensed more loci, but putting my PAOs along that was like cutting butter vs the shelf fiasco.

22 August, 2011 - 07:51
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

Quote:

I did something like that in London last summer, but only did two journeys of 70 and 20 loci, and put the images in a word processor document, not slides. I should have been thinking on a larger scale.

Josh, since I will be in London for a week, I was curious about your experience, since I am thinking about memorizing a journey there - though I do not know London very much.
Which were the places you memorized?

alessandro

22 August, 2011 - 10:51
Offline
Joined: 2 years 3 months ago

Here are the two lists. I don't know if they were the best choices, but it's what I ended up with. :)

I'll email you the PDF since it has some photos from Google Images that are copyrighted.

LONDON 1
Little Ben (clock by Victoria station)
Duke of York Restaurant
Cornish Bakehouse
Grosvenor Gardens
5 - Noodle shop
Side entrance Buckingham Palace - arch
The Queens Gallery
Other door
Grassy area
10 - Entrance near pickpocket sign
Buckingham Palace gate
Buckingham Palace near guard booth
Fountain Steps
Fountain Statues
15 - Canada Gate
Grassy Triangle
The Green Park Sign
Canada memorial
Row of Trees
20 - Guard booths on left where the crowd was
Mall road - middle of road
St James Park Gate (open)
St. James Park Grass
Inn the Park
25 - St. James Park Pond
Wooden snack stand
Horse guards open area in back
next to ivy wall
Admiralty Arch
30 - Pillar Statue Steps
Pillar Door
Statue Group
Red Phone Booth
Theatre Royal Haymarket
35 - Piccadilly Buskers
Piccadilly Circus Statue Steps
Waterstones entrance
Leicester Square
St Martin-in-the-Fields (front steps)
40 - The National Gallery (among the pillars)
On the checkered ground
Steps down
Bathroom Entrance, just inside
In the fountain
45 - In front of statue
Around pillar
Charing Cross Station Cone
Horse Guards front (tunnel where the guard was)
Banqueting House - from illustration
50 - Downing Street
The Glorious Dead monument in middle of street
At the base of Big Ben clock
Houses of Parliament, grassy area by Cromwell statue
Sovereign's Entrance
55 - Emmeline Pankhurst Statue, entering Victoria Tower
Gardens
Rodin statue
muddy bank of the Thames (looking over wall), Victoria Tower
Gardens
bench under row of trees, Victoria Tower Gardens
Buxton Memorial fountain, Victoria Tower Gardens
60 - Playground
Bridge
Jewel Tower - square grassy patch
"sundial" in sidewalk
St Margrets Church, three arches at main entrance
65 - Westminster Abbey, alcove on left
Westminster Abbey, main doors.
Westminster Abbey, doors on right
Westminster Abbey, grass
Westminster Abbey gift shop
70 - Building lot with tall statue/pillar

LONDON 2
About to get on Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge middle
Dead Man's Hole
Entrance to tower area (by timeline)
5 - Bombards
Bridge
Under bridge
Cradle Tower doorway (on grass)
Where the grass meets the water near Traitors' Gate
10 - In front of Traitors' Gate
The Queen's Stairs
By the benches
Saluting Battery area
Western Entrance grass
15 - Small garden
Wharfinger Cottage entrance
Gift shop
Entrance to Tower of London
Grassy area where tent was (remove tent & catapult)
20 - Open area

22 August, 2011 - 12:03
Offline
Joined: 6 years 2 months ago

thanks a lot!

22 August, 2011 - 21:57
Offline
Joined: 6 years 1 month ago

Josh Cohen wrote:

Here are the two lists. I don't know if they were the best choices, but it's what I ended up with. :)

I'll email you the PDF since it has some photos from Google Images that are copyrighted.

Can you send it to me too? Thanks!

24 August, 2011 - 08:51
Offline
Joined: 2 years 3 months ago

Sent...

24 September, 2011 - 07:39
Offline
Joined: 6 years 1 month ago

I think the more you go round your palace the more able you will be to expand it naturally. Depends where you are with the level of detail.

My new palace is ridiculously big and it's growing at a rate of about 80 loci per day, designating a link story or other objects to those loci. I feel like an encyclopedia type sponge, the concepts and ideas are organically growing in my mind. I have a bigger dilemma though:

How many loci should we be comfortably creating on a day-to-day basis?

Only time will tell i guess. I'm spending most of my 'lost' time ie the shower/toilet etc in review mode to keep up with the new expansion.

Learn memory techniques for free! Just click the "Sign up" button below to create an account and we'll send you an email with some tips on how to get started.

Related content: